The Cotswold Way National Trail winds 164 kilometres through the rolling Cotswold hills from the charming market town of Chipping Campden to the ancient city of Bath. As you walk along the Cotswold escarpment, you will be awestruck by the English countryside. Along the way, you will pass through villages like Birdlip, Painswick, and Dursley. As you wander through the town, you can see the ancient and famous stones of the Cotswolds while you window shop or relax with a delicious lunch in a local restaurant.

On the Cotswold Way, you will be astounded with views of the countryside extending for hundreds of miles. Peaceful rolling hills, wide-open skies, and a plethora of unique wildlife will bring you peace on your journey. See if you can spot frog orchid, the Chalkhill Blue Butterfly, and the Oystercatcher!

Cotswolds Villages, Trails & Stratford-upon-Avon

Self-guided

Hike across rolling English countryside, explore over 30 historic wool towns and thatched villages of the Northern Cotswolds, including Shakespeare’s town of Stratford-upon-Avon.

Self-guided 7 Days From $1475 Moderate What's Included

Cotswolds Villages, Trails & Stratford-upon-Avon

BACK
What's Included
  • 6 nights accommodation in 4* boutique guest houses, traditional inns and B&Bs
  • All luggage transfers
  • Pack free inn to inn walking
  • Private transfer on day 4 from Chipping Campden to Stratford-upon-Avon
  • 6 breakfasts, 1 welcome dinner
  • Maps, guidebook and route notes
  • 24/7 telephone support from the local Auswalk UK office
  • Flexible itinerary to suit your walking needs
  • Enjoy worry free navigation with your comprehensive maps, route notes and guidebook
  • A day in Stratford-upon-Avon to the visit the world-famous Shakespearean sights

Cotswold Way

Self-guided

Walk England’s quintessential picture postcard Cotswold Way in 9 days. Hike through rolling countryside and honey coloured villages, finishing at the UNESCO listed city of Bath.

Self-guided 9 Days From $1875 Moderate What's Included

Cotswold Way

BACK
What's Included
  • 8 nights accommodation in B&B’s, pubs and 3* hotels
  • All luggage transfers
  • Pack free inn to inn walking
  • Flexibility to add nights and further explore this timeless region of England
  • 8 breakfasts and 4 lunches
  • A day to explore the Roman and Georgian architecture and sights of Bath
  • Maps, guidebook and route notes
  • 24/7 telephone support

Cotswold Way Uncovered

Self-guided

Walk England’s quintessential picture postcard Cotswold Way in 11 days. Hike through rolling countryside and honey coloured villages, finishing at the UNESCO listed city of Bath.

Self-guided 11 Days From $2295 Moderate What's Included

Cotswold Way Uncovered

BACK
What's Included
  • 10 nights accommodation in B&B’s, pubs and 3* hotels
  • All luggage transfers
  • Pack free inn to inn walking
  • Flexible walking itinerary to shorten the walks or add in a rest day
  • A night in the village of Painswick to explore gardens, tea rooms and pubs
  • 10 breakfasts, 7 lunches and 1 dinner
  • A day to explore the Roman and Georgian architecture of Bath
  • Maps, guidebook and route notes
  • 24/7 telephone support

OVERVIEW

The Cotswold Way National Trail winds 164 kilometres through the rolling Cotswold hills from the charming market town of Chipping Campden to the ancient city of Bath. As you walk along the Cotswold escarpment, you will be awestruck by the English countryside. Along the way, you will pass through villages like Birdlip, Painswick, and Dursley. As you wander through the town, you can see the ancient and famous stones of the Cotswolds while you window shop or relax with a delicious lunch in a local restaurant.

On the Cotswold Way, you will be astounded with views of the countryside extending for hundreds of miles. Peaceful rolling hills, wide-open skies, and a plethora of unique wildlife will bring you peace on your journey. See if you can spot frog orchid, the Chalkhill Blue Butterfly, and the Oystercatcher!

READ MORE

History of the Cotswolds

The Cotswolds is steeped in history and culture that is centuries in the making. The Cotswolds originally got its fame from its highly lucrative wool trade, with Cotswold wool being known as the best wool in all of Europe. The rolling hillsides and endless areas for pastures made for a perfect location to raise giant flocks of sheep. In the Middle Ages, that is precisely what they did, and soon 50% of England’s economy was based on wool. Abbeys and monasteries raised “Cotswold Lions,” which are sheep known for their long golden fleeces, and merchants soon became rich. The wool industry grew so large at one point that King Charles II made it mandatory for the deceased to be buried in wool; this is how the idiom “You can’t pull the wool over my eyes” came to be, meaning that “I am not dead.”

The Cotswolds created more than wool over the centuries. The trade from this area included the unique honey-coloured stone seen in the villages, silk, tobacco leaves, and as routes for salt and coaching. Even with these incredibly lucrative trade practices, the Cotswolds was not always a land of peace.

The Cotswolds was at the centre of two civil wars, one from 1642 to 1645 and another from 1648 to 1649. These wars were fought by King Charles I and his Royalists against the supporters of Parliament. The king had his headquarters at Oxford, the Parliamentarians had garrisons at Gloucester and Bristol, and there were sympathisers at Malmesbury and Cirencester. The Cotswolds held enormous strategic importance, and the first battle of the Civil War was actually fought at Edgehill, on the northern edge of the region. Eventually, the Parliamentary Force won, but not without leaving lasting impressions of war upon this glorious landscape.

Centuries have passed and the Cotswolds today has become a peaceful landscape of adorable villages, tasteful manors, and hidden gardens. You can find rest and relaxation at cute guest houses, fine dining establishments, cosy pubs, and specialised shops.

History of the Cotswold Way

The Cotswolds is a 164-kilometre-long National Trail that is centuries in the making. For hundreds of years, the trails that created the framework of the Cotswold Way were traversed by farmers, hunters, animals, and anyone else who had to pass through the region. To give an extra historical zing, William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon Avon in Warwickshire, which means that earlier in his life he must have walked along these same trails perhaps musing of epic poetry.

In 1966, the Cotswolds was designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Soon after, in 1970, this path was established in conjunction with the Cotswold AONB by the members of the Rambler’s Association. Almost 30 years later, in 1998, the national trail was approved for development; although it was not until May of 2007 that the path was formally launched. This is one of only 16 trails of its kind in all of England and Wales, making it a unique cultural experience that visitors love to flock to each year.

Flora & Fauna

The Cotswolds was designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in 1966 due to its rare limestone grasslands, ancient beech woodlands, and being the habitat for some of the most endangered species in British wildlife. The area covers 2038 sq. Km, which is over 80% farmland, making this the largest AONB in all of England and Wales.

Sheltered wooded valleys are primarily made up of ancient beechwoods, but ash, oak, elm, field maple, and whitebeam can also be found. Bramble and ivy create a thick undergrowth, a haven for small woodland creatures. Rarer plants also make an appearance under the shelter of the trees. You can find yellow star-of-Bethlehem, stinking hellebore, and fingered sedge. As you walk along the trails, you will spot the wild colours of bluebells, violets, primroses, early-purple orchids, and more.

The limestone grasslands that make up much of your journey have become rich and dense in flora due to hundreds of years of grazing. You will be able to spot cowslips, rock-rose, wild thyme, yellow rattle, kidney vetch, and many more plant species dotting the landscape. This area is well known for its plethora of orchids; you can see the greater butterfly orchids, bee orchids, frog orchids, musk orchids, and the rare green-winged orchids. If you have a love of flowers, then this is the place for you. There will be more flowers than you ever expected to see, right at your fingertips. Crickley Hills has actually been marked as a Site of Special Scientific Interest for its wildflowers, one of which encourages the return of the Chalkhill Blue butterfly each year.

With all of the protective undergrowth and wildflower-laden meadows, this area is a haven for animals that once were at risk for extinction. With the help of conservation efforts, animals such as water voles, owls, and otters have made a comeback in this area.
Birdwatching is also a favourite in this region. It is so popular that the Cotswold Water Park Trust runs guided walks and puts out a seasonal leaflet indicating which birds are anticipated to be around. In springtime, warblers, hirundines, nightingales, hobbies, and occasionally a red-footed falcon can be seen. The little ringed plover, the oystercatcher, and a large variety of ducks can be found in the summer. If you happen to be visiting in Autumn, then you may be able to witness the vast numbers of birds migrating south for the winter. While England may not be considered a nature hub by the average tourist, you will be surprised at all the charming creatures hiding in plain sight.

Local Cuisine

When travelling to England, it is essential to taste the local food. Fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, toad in the hole, and traditional roast beef some of the classic British dishes that are served in most local pubs across the Cotswolds. You can also find a wide variety of global restaurants (such as Italian and Indian) along with high class dining establishments that include, 5 North Street (a Michelin star restaurant in Winchcombe).

In addition, beer is considered one of the most critical aspects of British life. The quality and variety are extraordinary, and if you are looking for your perfect beer, then this is the place to find it!

Transport

If you’re walking the Cotswold Way, this tour begins in Chipping Campden and ends in Bath, whereas the ‘Cotswolds Villages and Trails to Stratford-upon-Avon’ begins in Moreton in Marsh and ends in Stratford upon Avon. Details on how to reach the start of your walk are outlined on each individual tour page and in the detailed pre-departure travel pack.

During your walking holiday, we will transport your luggage for each accommodation. All you will have to carry is a lightweight daypack.

climate/weather

The Cotswolds is located in southern England, so keeping the weather in mind is especially important when planning your walking holiday. England is known for having mixed weather, which is why we scheduled our departures during the optimum walking months of the year, from April to October.

During the months of April, May, September and October the temperatures range from around 20 °C during the day with nighttime lows of around 9.6°C at night.

June through August are when the temperatures are the hottest. Day time can reach up to 23°C, which is still considered cool and comfortable for many travellers who come from more tropical regions. There is a higher chance for precipitation during this time, with an average of 4 to 7 days a month.

In September and October, the weather can feel a bit colder, especially with the wind chill. The daily temperatures range from 19.9°C to 8.7°C. In addition, there is a higher chance of rainfall. Even with these conditions, this is the busiest tourism season of the year.

Terrain

The Cotswold Hills are made of the most complete and outstanding outcrop of Jurassic-age rocks in the region. These rocks were formed between 145 and 199 million years ago, and they extend all the way to Yorkshire. While they may not look that special to the untrained eye, this trail is a geologists paradise. The stone famous in this area is known as oolitic limestone, which is a sedimentary rock formed in the warm seas of the Jurassic age. With the eventual change in sea levels, the land slowly became what it is today with the addition of clay, silt, and sand layers. Many ancient fossils have been discovered here within the ancient rocks.

As you walk along the Cotswolds, the route will take you along rolling hills, over limestone grasslands, through ancient beechwood woodlands, and into the small villages and towns that dot along the path. The walk traverses many hills, with the total ascent being around 4,000m and the highest point just 317m above sea level.

when to walk

We have kept the rainy British weather in mind when creating this fabulous walking holiday for you. Therefore, this lovely walking holiday through the Cotswolds is available only from April to October, with the April schedule corresponding to how the holidays fall. If you are curious about more details on when to walk, see our weather section.

walking fitness levels

Typically, your walking holiday will consist of reasonably easy walking of about 25km per day with approximately 300m-600m of ascent and descent each day. The trails are well managed and traverse a variety of terrain. You will mainly be walking on forest tracks, woodland trails, bridleways, across farmland and meadows, in addition to walking through the villages and towns. For navigation, the routes are usually well marked, but for each of your walks, you will receive route notes, a map, and the GPX tracks if using your own device.

While some may think that walking the Cotswolds would be a literal walk in the park, it may prove more challenging than expected. This trail is graded as moderate, and the track will have steep hill sections, rough surfaces, and steps. Some of the rolling hills are taller than they appear, with poor weather increasing the difficulty. The walk will be most enjoyable for people who maintain a moderately active lifestyle, exercising 2 to 3 times a week.

walking essentials

As with any journey, it is essential to be prepared for your self-guided walking holiday. While we will be transporting your luggage from place to place, you will still be carrying a light-weight day pack with you. Keep in mind that you are walking through England, which is known for its finicky weather. It is best to be prepared for a little bit of rain or wet ground. Here is what we suggest that you carry with you each day:

  • Walking notes, map, and a map case
  • Picnic lunch packed in an insulated container (when supplied)
  • Quality waterproof jacket with a hood
  • Quick drying warm layer and/or jacket
  • Quick drying short or long sleeve t-shirts or shirts
  • Waterproof over-trousers/li>
  • Warm hat & gloves
  • Sunhat
  • Comfortable waterproof walking shoes / waterproof hiking boots
  • Sunscreen (at least 15+)
  • 2 to 3 litres of water (in bottle(s) or hydration system)
  • First aid kit
  • Toilet paper
  • Local currency & credit cards
  • Mobile phone & waterproof cover (please note that phone signal is not available in all walk areas)
  • Personal insect repellent, band-aids, and a small container of salt missed with rice grains
  • Personal necessities (example: required medication)

Now that we have the essentials packed, it is time to think of those additional items that may be worth packing along with you. These may include and are not limited to:

  • Sunglasses
  • Camera (with extra battery or sim cards)
  • Small battery charger for mobile phone
  • Binoculars
  • Notebook and pen
  • Matches
  • Small torch
  • Walking pole/s
  • Thermos (for hot drinks)
  • Personal snacks throughout the day
  • Waterproof bags to keep your personal items in your daypack dry when walking
  • Personal medication
  • Passport & credit cards (never pack your passport in your main luggage)
Overview

OVERVIEW

The Cotswold Way National Trail winds 164 kilometres through the rolling Cotswold hills from the charming market town of Chipping Campden to the ancient city of Bath. As you walk along the Cotswold escarpment, you will be awestruck by the English countryside. Along the way, you will pass through villages like Birdlip, Painswick, and Dursley. As you wander through the town, you can see the ancient and famous stones of the Cotswolds while you window shop or relax with a delicious lunch in a local restaurant.

On the Cotswold Way, you will be astounded with views of the countryside extending for hundreds of miles. Peaceful rolling hills, wide-open skies, and a plethora of unique wildlife will bring you peace on your journey. See if you can spot frog orchid, the Chalkhill Blue Butterfly, and the Oystercatcher!

READ MORE
History of the Cotswolds

History of the Cotswolds

The Cotswolds is steeped in history and culture that is centuries in the making. The Cotswolds originally got its fame from its highly lucrative wool trade, with Cotswold wool being known as the best wool in all of Europe. The rolling hillsides and endless areas for pastures made for a perfect location to raise giant flocks of sheep. In the Middle Ages, that is precisely what they did, and soon 50% of England’s economy was based on wool. Abbeys and monasteries raised “Cotswold Lions,” which are sheep known for their long golden fleeces, and merchants soon became rich. The wool industry grew so large at one point that King Charles II made it mandatory for the deceased to be buried in wool; this is how the idiom “You can’t pull the wool over my eyes” came to be, meaning that “I am not dead.”

The Cotswolds created more than wool over the centuries. The trade from this area included the unique honey-coloured stone seen in the villages, silk, tobacco leaves, and as routes for salt and coaching. Even with these incredibly lucrative trade practices, the Cotswolds was not always a land of peace.

The Cotswolds was at the centre of two civil wars, one from 1642 to 1645 and another from 1648 to 1649. These wars were fought by King Charles I and his Royalists against the supporters of Parliament. The king had his headquarters at Oxford, the Parliamentarians had garrisons at Gloucester and Bristol, and there were sympathisers at Malmesbury and Cirencester. The Cotswolds held enormous strategic importance, and the first battle of the Civil War was actually fought at Edgehill, on the northern edge of the region. Eventually, the Parliamentary Force won, but not without leaving lasting impressions of war upon this glorious landscape.

Centuries have passed and the Cotswolds today has become a peaceful landscape of adorable villages, tasteful manors, and hidden gardens. You can find rest and relaxation at cute guest houses, fine dining establishments, cosy pubs, and specialised shops.

History of the Cotswold Way

The Cotswolds is a 164-kilometre-long National Trail that is centuries in the making. For hundreds of years, the trails that created the framework of the Cotswold Way were traversed by farmers, hunters, animals, and anyone else who had to pass through the region. To give an extra historical zing, William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon Avon in Warwickshire, which means that earlier in his life he must have walked along these same trails perhaps musing of epic poetry.

In 1966, the Cotswolds was designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Soon after, in 1970, this path was established in conjunction with the Cotswold AONB by the members of the Rambler’s Association. Almost 30 years later, in 1998, the national trail was approved for development; although it was not until May of 2007 that the path was formally launched. This is one of only 16 trails of its kind in all of England and Wales, making it a unique cultural experience that visitors love to flock to each year.

Flora & Fauna

Flora & Fauna

The Cotswolds was designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) in 1966 due to its rare limestone grasslands, ancient beech woodlands, and being the habitat for some of the most endangered species in British wildlife. The area covers 2038 sq. Km, which is over 80% farmland, making this the largest AONB in all of England and Wales.

Sheltered wooded valleys are primarily made up of ancient beechwoods, but ash, oak, elm, field maple, and whitebeam can also be found. Bramble and ivy create a thick undergrowth, a haven for small woodland creatures. Rarer plants also make an appearance under the shelter of the trees. You can find yellow star-of-Bethlehem, stinking hellebore, and fingered sedge. As you walk along the trails, you will spot the wild colours of bluebells, violets, primroses, early-purple orchids, and more.

The limestone grasslands that make up much of your journey have become rich and dense in flora due to hundreds of years of grazing. You will be able to spot cowslips, rock-rose, wild thyme, yellow rattle, kidney vetch, and many more plant species dotting the landscape. This area is well known for its plethora of orchids; you can see the greater butterfly orchids, bee orchids, frog orchids, musk orchids, and the rare green-winged orchids. If you have a love of flowers, then this is the place for you. There will be more flowers than you ever expected to see, right at your fingertips. Crickley Hills has actually been marked as a Site of Special Scientific Interest for its wildflowers, one of which encourages the return of the Chalkhill Blue butterfly each year.

With all of the protective undergrowth and wildflower-laden meadows, this area is a haven for animals that once were at risk for extinction. With the help of conservation efforts, animals such as water voles, owls, and otters have made a comeback in this area.
Birdwatching is also a favourite in this region. It is so popular that the Cotswold Water Park Trust runs guided walks and puts out a seasonal leaflet indicating which birds are anticipated to be around. In springtime, warblers, hirundines, nightingales, hobbies, and occasionally a red-footed falcon can be seen. The little ringed plover, the oystercatcher, and a large variety of ducks can be found in the summer. If you happen to be visiting in Autumn, then you may be able to witness the vast numbers of birds migrating south for the winter. While England may not be considered a nature hub by the average tourist, you will be surprised at all the charming creatures hiding in plain sight.

Local Cuisine

Local Cuisine

When travelling to England, it is essential to taste the local food. Fish and chips, shepherd’s pie, toad in the hole, and traditional roast beef some of the classic British dishes that are served in most local pubs across the Cotswolds. You can also find a wide variety of global restaurants (such as Italian and Indian) along with high class dining establishments that include, 5 North Street (a Michelin star restaurant in Winchcombe).

In addition, beer is considered one of the most critical aspects of British life. The quality and variety are extraordinary, and if you are looking for your perfect beer, then this is the place to find it!

Transport

Transport

If you’re walking the Cotswold Way, this tour begins in Chipping Campden and ends in Bath, whereas the ‘Cotswolds Villages and Trails to Stratford-upon-Avon’ begins in Moreton in Marsh and ends in Stratford upon Avon. Details on how to reach the start of your walk are outlined on each individual tour page and in the detailed pre-departure travel pack.

During your walking holiday, we will transport your luggage for each accommodation. All you will have to carry is a lightweight daypack.

climate/weather

climate/weather

The Cotswolds is located in southern England, so keeping the weather in mind is especially important when planning your walking holiday. England is known for having mixed weather, which is why we scheduled our departures during the optimum walking months of the year, from April to October.

During the months of April, May, September and October the temperatures range from around 20 °C during the day with nighttime lows of around 9.6°C at night.

June through August are when the temperatures are the hottest. Day time can reach up to 23°C, which is still considered cool and comfortable for many travellers who come from more tropical regions. There is a higher chance for precipitation during this time, with an average of 4 to 7 days a month.

In September and October, the weather can feel a bit colder, especially with the wind chill. The daily temperatures range from 19.9°C to 8.7°C. In addition, there is a higher chance of rainfall. Even with these conditions, this is the busiest tourism season of the year.

Terrain

Terrain

The Cotswold Hills are made of the most complete and outstanding outcrop of Jurassic-age rocks in the region. These rocks were formed between 145 and 199 million years ago, and they extend all the way to Yorkshire. While they may not look that special to the untrained eye, this trail is a geologists paradise. The stone famous in this area is known as oolitic limestone, which is a sedimentary rock formed in the warm seas of the Jurassic age. With the eventual change in sea levels, the land slowly became what it is today with the addition of clay, silt, and sand layers. Many ancient fossils have been discovered here within the ancient rocks.

As you walk along the Cotswolds, the route will take you along rolling hills, over limestone grasslands, through ancient beechwood woodlands, and into the small villages and towns that dot along the path. The walk traverses many hills, with the total ascent being around 4,000m and the highest point just 317m above sea level.

when to walk

when to walk

We have kept the rainy British weather in mind when creating this fabulous walking holiday for you. Therefore, this lovely walking holiday through the Cotswolds is available only from April to October, with the April schedule corresponding to how the holidays fall. If you are curious about more details on when to walk, see our weather section.

walking fitness levels

walking fitness levels

Typically, your walking holiday will consist of reasonably easy walking of about 25km per day with approximately 300m-600m of ascent and descent each day. The trails are well managed and traverse a variety of terrain. You will mainly be walking on forest tracks, woodland trails, bridleways, across farmland and meadows, in addition to walking through the villages and towns. For navigation, the routes are usually well marked, but for each of your walks, you will receive route notes, a map, and the GPX tracks if using your own device.

While some may think that walking the Cotswolds would be a literal walk in the park, it may prove more challenging than expected. This trail is graded as moderate, and the track will have steep hill sections, rough surfaces, and steps. Some of the rolling hills are taller than they appear, with poor weather increasing the difficulty. The walk will be most enjoyable for people who maintain a moderately active lifestyle, exercising 2 to 3 times a week.

walking essentials

walking essentials

As with any journey, it is essential to be prepared for your self-guided walking holiday. While we will be transporting your luggage from place to place, you will still be carrying a light-weight day pack with you. Keep in mind that you are walking through England, which is known for its finicky weather. It is best to be prepared for a little bit of rain or wet ground. Here is what we suggest that you carry with you each day:

  • Walking notes, map, and a map case
  • Picnic lunch packed in an insulated container (when supplied)
  • Quality waterproof jacket with a hood
  • Quick drying warm layer and/or jacket
  • Quick drying short or long sleeve t-shirts or shirts
  • Waterproof over-trousers/li>
  • Warm hat & gloves
  • Sunhat
  • Comfortable waterproof walking shoes / waterproof hiking boots
  • Sunscreen (at least 15+)
  • 2 to 3 litres of water (in bottle(s) or hydration system)
  • First aid kit
  • Toilet paper
  • Local currency & credit cards
  • Mobile phone & waterproof cover (please note that phone signal is not available in all walk areas)
  • Personal insect repellent, band-aids, and a small container of salt missed with rice grains
  • Personal necessities (example: required medication)

Now that we have the essentials packed, it is time to think of those additional items that may be worth packing along with you. These may include and are not limited to:

  • Sunglasses
  • Camera (with extra battery or sim cards)
  • Small battery charger for mobile phone
  • Binoculars
  • Notebook and pen
  • Matches
  • Small torch
  • Walking pole/s
  • Thermos (for hot drinks)
  • Personal snacks throughout the day
  • Waterproof bags to keep your personal items in your daypack dry when walking
  • Personal medication
  • Passport & credit cards (never pack your passport in your main luggage)

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If you’re looking for further information on any of our walking holidays please fill out the enquiry form and we’ll be in touch.

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