The Tasman Peninsula is a short 90min drive from Hobart, even less from the airport.  The peninsula is both home to Australia’s most infamous penal colony, the historic Port Arthur Penal colony and now also the Three Capes walk.

This walk is Tasmania’s premium coastal walking experience as it traverses one of Australia’s most dramatic and inhospitable landscapes. The original settlers chose this location in part due to the insurmountable prospect of escape. Fortunately, we benefit from the well-maintained tracks as we escape through the same dense forest and up and over the most dramatic escarpments that kept the early inhabitants trapped.

The Tasman Peninsula is one of the most striking parts of Tasmania and the walk incorporates all the best parts including the iconic towering sea stacks, the highest vertical sea cliffs in Australia. Wander over the 190 million-year-old dolerite columns and via a great variety of landscapes, as the track winds in and out of temperate rainforest heathland, dry woodland and over striking sections of coastline.

The turquoise waters and white sandy beach of Fortescue Bay and Waterfall Bay area are a welcome change-up from the cliff-hugging walking experience that characterises most of the track. The massive seas at Cape Hauy, Cape Raoul and the amazing Shipsterns Bluff,  one of the preeminent big wave surf locations worldwide, is an amazing side-show to this already amazing adventure.

What’s more whales and dolphins are regular visitors to the areas as are albatross, sea eagles, peregrine falcons, diving gannets and cliff-nesting cormorants. All make this their home in or around the ocean surrounding Tasman Peninsula National Park.

Walk each day with the confidence that you’re being looked after by one of Australia’s oldest walking companies and two experienced guides.  The self-guided version of Three Capes walk allows you to walk with your own friends, when you want at your own pace. What’s more you’ll stay in comfort, eat chef-prepared 2-course dinners, cooked breakfasts and enjoy lunch at some of the most epic locations Australia has to offer.

Three Capes, Tasman Peninsula and Port Arthur

Self-guided

Three Capes, Cape Hauy and  Cape Raoul, Waterfall Bay, Fortescue Bay and Port Arthur. Dramatic coastline of sea caves and towering sea stacks.

Self-guided 4 Days From $1995 Moderate What's Included

Three Capes, Tasman Peninsula and Port Arthur

BACK
What's Included
  • All transport including private transfers to and from Hobart
  • Genuine all inclusive pack free walking holiday
  • 3 nights’ comfortable accommodation with ensuites
  • Chef prepared restaurant meals
  • Cooked breakfasts and walker lunches
  • Auswalk guide pack including comprehensive walk notes, maps, lunch bag and container

Three Capes and the Tasman Peninsula

Group-guided

Hike at Cape Hauy, Cape Raoul and Fortescue Bay, Canoe Bay Tasman Arch, Blow Holes, Waterfall Bay. Visit Port Arthur and see the region from the sea on an Eco wildlife boat cruise.

Group-guided 4 Days From $2195 Moderate What's Included

Three Capes and the Tasman Peninsula

BACK
What's Included
  • Genuine all inclusive pack free walking holiday
  • 2 engaging, knowledgeable and experienced guides
  • Boat cruise and wildlife watching
  • 3 nights’ comfortable accommodation in log cabins and chalets with shared common areas
  • Chef prepared restaurant meals
  • All transport from Hobart and luggage transport
  • National Park admission
  • Auswalk guide pack including notes, maps, lunch bag and container

Bay of Fires, Freycinet, Wineglass Bay & Three Capes

Group-guided

A walking symphony in 3 movements. Bay of Fires with its pink granite, orange lichen boulders & white beaches. Freycinet Peninsula & Wineglass Bay.

Group-guided 7 Days From $3195 Easy to Moderate What's Included

Bay of Fires, Freycinet, Wineglass Bay & Three Capes

BACK
What's Included
  • Genuine all inclusive pack free walking holiday
  • 2 engaging, knowledgeable and experienced guides
  • 6 nights private accommodation in rooms with ensuites
  • 6 cooked breakfasts and 6 dinners prepared by professional chefs with an emphasis on Tasmanian local produce
  • Comprehensive walkers lunches every day augmented by Auswalk’s trail mix
  • All transport from Launceston to Hobart
  • National park admission
  • Auswalk guide pack including notes, maps, map case, insulated lunch bag and container

OVERVIEW

Auswalk will provide you with all the comforts you need to have a splendid walk and relaxing experience. You can choose either a self-guided or group-guided Three Capes walking holiday. You will stay in our favourite accommodations, taste the delicious fresh produce of the region. You get to traverse the trails with nothing more than a light day pack, and we will take care of the rest.

Auswalk provides two self-guided and two guided Three Capes walking holidays for your pleasure. Effectively Auswalk provides a lot more as they can customize any of their walks to suit, adding more or taking away days to suit each walker’s specialised needs.

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Flora & Fauna

FLORA

The pine-like trees on the track with woody nuts are Tasmanian Native Cypress Pines (Callitris rhomboidea) – the scientific name describes the interesting shape of the nuts quite well! You may also encounter Yellow-Tailed Black Cockatoos in this area. These fabulous birds mainly eat seeds including gum trees, banksias, hakeas, and grass trees. They also dismember seed cones looking for wood-boring insects. The birds here belong to a subspecies found only in Tasmania (Calyptorhynchus funereus xanthanotus).

The exposed, rocky high points on the 3 Capes Track are dominated by hardy alpine shrubs like Pinkberries and other heath species. In January, the track may be lined with pink wildflowers. These are Trigger Plants (Stylidium). The name refers to the pollination mechanism of the flowers. When an insect lands on one of the blooms, their weight triggers the spring-loaded white “floral column” (fused stigma + anthers) to dab it with pollen, & at the same time reciprocally collect any pollen that the insect may already be carrying. The tall, spindly looking plants alonmg the walk, with strappy leaves arranged in spiral clusters are Pineapple Candleheath, a Tasmanian alpine endemic (Richea dracophylla).

You will also see many conifer-like trees with long, thin, drooping green branches on the last section of the walk. Depending on the season, these trees may have small, fleshy, red-orange fruits with a green seed embedded in them. These are known as Native Cherriesalso (Exocarpus cupressiformis) which are edible when ripe. Give one a try when you are there! They really are quite tasty.

You will likely see many Banksias in flower on the Tasman Peninsula. These are Silver Banksias (B. marginata – also found in VIC, NSW, ACT, and SA). They may grow up to 9m in height but will start to produce flowers as soon as they are over 1m tall. Silver Banksias are significant producers of nectar for birds and insects in this region. You will hear the “eee-gypt” call of the Crescent Honeyeater around the Banksias.

FAUNA

The Tasman Peninsula and the 3 Capes area is a haven for wildlife from the tiniest of Pygmy possums to wombats,  Seals,  Whales, Dolphins, Tasmanian Devils and wallabies.

Long-Nosed Fur Seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) are becoming more common to the area now they are not hunted. Approx. 75 – 100 individuals may be hauled out here. During the 1800s, these fur seals were hunted almost to extinction for their thick fur coats. They are now slowly recovering. This species is found in Tasmania, Western Australia, South Australia, and New Zealand. In Tasmanian waters, it mainly occurs on the west and south coasts. Only a small number of long-nosed fur seals (also sometimes known as the New Zealand fur seal) breed on remote islands off the south coast. The total population in Tasmania is 350 – 450. About 100 pups are born annually. Australia-wide, the population is estimated to be 58,000. Their main prey includes redbait, jack mackerel, and lantern fish. They also eat seabirds such as little penguins and shearwaters.

There are two wallaby species in the peninsula, the endemic Tasmanian pademelon found nowhere else on earth and Bennetts wallabies. They are easy to spot as you walk as their numbers are fairly high now that they are protected.

The Tasmanian bettong and Long-nosed potoroo, also both macropods, are more likely to be seen at night, possibly around your accommodations. Macropods are the common name given to marsupials that generally have largish hind legs.

Through the day you are likely to spot Echidnas, Blue-tongue lizards sunning themselves and a wide variety of other fauna. Echidnas are monotremes, egg laying mammals, the other being platypus. Their spiky exterior is the defence to any threat from predators.

Birdlife includes Tasmanian rosellas, Tasmanian native hens and White-bellied sea eagles which breed on the peninsula. If you look hard owls and tawny frogmouth roosting in the trees, even through the day.

Common wombats are prolific in the area, although generally nocturnal, they can be seen before dusk scratching away searching and foraging for food. A koala’s closest living relative they can actually grow up to 1.3m long and weigh up to 35 kgs. Interestingly they have been clocked running at speeds of 40 km per hour and their poo is cube-shaped.

Tasmanian devils have a fearsome reputation but they are actually shy. These were reintroduced by Tasmanian Parks. They are a marsupial with sharp teeth and an otherwordly howl, which led to them to being called a devil by the early settlers. Devils are carnivores and can weigh up to 14kgs, however they mostly eat carrion, but they do hunt down snakes, birds, insects and fish.

Lastly, it is worth mentioning the common brushtail and ringtail possums, they are loving it on the peninsula, with limited predation, previously mostly by humans, they are easy to spot in the evening in eucalypt trees that surround the accommodations.

 

FAQ

WHERE IS THE THREE CAPES WALK LOCATED?

The Three Capes walk is on the Tasman Peninsula, which is located in the south-east of Tasmania. On the way to the peninsula, you will drive through some of Tasmania’s rich heritage, rolling vineyards and hills. It is approximately 100 kms from CBD Hobart a travel time of about 90 minutes by vehicle.

Please Note: The official Three Capes Track route does not go to all three Capes, just two of them, we also only walk to two of the Capes. Please read the itinerary or see the Highlights for further information.

WHAT LEVEL OF FITNESS DO YOU RECOMMEND?

We expect people to have a reasonable level of fitness. Regular physical exercise in the lead up to the trip is recommended. This can be from walking, cycling, going to the gym or a combination of these. You will walk an average of 11kms each day. Some of the walking has an up and down component, mixed in with flat and undulating sections of track. If you exercise regularly, have a moderate to good walking fitness level and feel capable of walking up to 5 to 6 hours a day, this walk is for you.

HOW CHALLENGING IS THE WALK?

Most of the tracks are in first rate condition. Some of the walks include sections of walking up and down again, but this is compensated by shorter walking distances overall. Full day walks average 10-15 kms. There are great opportunities for fit walkers to challenge themselves as there is plenty of additional walking that you can take up.

DO YOU HAVE AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM?

Walking with Auswalk gives you exclusive access to our incentive program. We love our Auswalkers and want to make it easy for you to return for another holiday. Here’s what we offer:

  1. Frequent Walker Points: Just by going on a holiday with us, you will earn 100 Frequent Walker Points which you can redeem for a $100 discount (per person) off your next Auswalk trip. These points are valid for 2 years. If you use your points on a new booking of a value greater than $2300 per person, and within 2 months of completing your previous holiday, we will double the points for you. This means that you will have 200 Frequent Walker Points to redeem as a $200 discount (per person) off your new booking. Please note: You can only use a maximum of 1 set of double points ($200) per new booking and points can’t be used in conjunction with any other offer.
  2. Save if your group is 5 or more with a 5% discount for all walkers. Full payment will be invoiced when booking. At the time of final payment the discount will be applied when the numbers are confirmed. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer.

 

DO I HAVE TO PAY A SINGLE SUPPLEMENT FEE IF I'M A SOLO WALKER?

Australian hotel accommodations (like the ones we use) charge the same, or just about the same price, regardless of whether there is one or two people in the room. This means that to cover the cost of the accommodation for your trip we do need to pass on a single supplement surcharge. This isn’t a cost that we make any margin on and it is simply to cover the fact that the total room cost isn’t being apportioned over two walkers.

CAN YOU RECOMMEND ANY PRE/POST WALK ACCOMMODATION?

There are numerous accommodations in Hobart. We suggest staying close to Salamanca Place and the waterfront. The options are vast and will depend entirely on your budget.

 

You may also like to visit the TripAdvisor and search for other options to best suit your budget and lifestyle.

WHAT LEVEL OF ACCOMMODATION DO YOU PROVIDE?

All the accommodations have been chosen to reflect the character of the region. Accommodations will range from small local hotels to lodges; you can be assured that wherever you stay, you will be warmly welcomed. Most importantly, the accommodations are in great locations and have all the necessary facilities to make your stay as comfortable as possible.

WHAT WILL BE INCLUDED IN MY PRE-DEPARTURE PACK?

You will receive an information pack before departure, including:

  • Map, Map case, luggage tag and pen
  • Insulated lunch bag, expandable lunch box, reusable cutlery and other useful bits and pieces
  • Comprehensive track notes developed by and authored by Auswalk with all the detail that will be needed to walk the Three Capes Walk.

CAN YOU CATER FOR SPECIAL DIETARY REQUIREMENTS?

On our walks, we can cater for specific dietary requirements. Please kindly provide this information when completing your booking form and only provide us with a list of your allergies or those food items that you absolutely cannot eat.

WILL I HAVE WI-FI ACCESS?

Wi-Fi access will be available at the accommodations along the track.

WHAT WILL THE WEATHER BE LIKE?

See the Bureau of Meteorology for information about temperatures and rainfall ahead of time to ensure proper clothing. Spring and autumn are a great time to walk on the Tasman Peninsula. Summer can be a little warmer but with average temperatures of only 18 degrees. Winter is often written off as a time not to visit Tasmanian, let alone walk because of the rain. Layers will be your best friend in these parts. However, if you look at the mean average rainfall it isn’t that much more than in summer. The average temperature in winter does, however, fall to 11 degrees so come prepared with warm clothes and good rain gear (realistically year round). See gear advice section in FAQ’s for more information.

WHAT WILDLIFE MAY I ENCOUNTER IN THIS REGION?

An abundance of animals and birds exist in this region. Wallabies, echidnas, wombats, pygmy, brushtail and ringtail possums, the Tasmanian bettong, long nosed potoroo, blue tongue lizards and Tasmanian devils (they are actually quite shy) to name a few.

Bird life includes Tasmanian rosellas, Tasmanian native hens and White-bellied sea eagles which breed on the peninsula.

Snakes are also most likely to be around in the summer months. They will usually move away from the sound and vibration of human activity. Did you know that Tasmania has only 3 species of snakes? Tiger, lowland copperhead and white-lipped snakes.

HOW IMPORTANT IS IT TO KEEP TO THE WALKING TRACKS?

By keeping to the walking track it reduces erosion, protects native vegetation and the spread of cinnamon fungus (it is a lethal disease that has serious consequences for many Australian habitats). You are also less likely to have a close encounter with snakes, ants, leeches, wasps, bees and ticks.

WHAT ARE YOUR LUGGAGE REQUIREMENTS?

You are allowed up to 23kgs of luggage, please no heavier as it may cause problems. Please also be aware that you may have to move your luggage to and from your room on some occasions, however, your luggage is transferred while you walk.

WILL I NEED WATERPROOF CLOTHING?

A waterproof jacket is ideal. It serves two functions – to keep you dry and to keep the wind out. Cheaper plastic or nylon raincoats are good for keeping the rain out, but unfortunately, they do not breathe meaning that you’ll still get wet from condensation and not really suitable for any walk.

By far the best jackets are made from waterproof and breathable fabrics such as Gore-Tex. These wick your body moisture through the Gore-Tex material to the outside of the jacket through one-way pores. Goretex and other similar jackets aren’t cheap, but most of the quality outdoor equipment stores have sales where prices can often be reduced by substantial amounts. And they last a lifetime! Your waterproof jacket is a practical item, designed to keep you warm, dry and comfortable in the bush and warm in areas where there is a risk of being cold.

WHAT CLOTHING SHOULD I PACK FOR COLD CONDITIONS?

Depending on the time of year you are visiting it can get quite cold, especially at night. A warm jumper is a must. The best material these days is polar fleece or equivalents as they are lightweight and dry very quickly if they get wet. Wool, on the other hand, is heavy and takes a long time to dry. Cotton is not appropriate. A warm hat is also desirable. Did you know that you lose 40% of your body heat through your head? So if you’re feeling cold, don a hat and feel the difference.

WHAT CLOTHING SHOULD I PACK FOR WALKING THROUGHOUT THE DAY?

We recommend thin synthetic materials for walking. Cotton can get damp from perspiration.

Shirts should have collars and sleeves to help prevent sunburn. Long sleeves that can be either rolled up or rolled down are a good idea. Light colours will keep you cooler. Specialist shirts have vents to allow for airflow.

Shorts are great for hot weather, but remember to use plenty of sunscreen. Long trousers are great for sun protection and also for cooler weather. Trousers that have “zip off” legs are a good compromise.

A sun hat is essential. Choose a hat with a brim all the way round as this keeps off more heat and sun than either baseball caps or a soft floppy cotton hats. Good hats also come with some mesh ventilation in the middle and a chinstrap to keep it on when the wind blows. Choose a hat that packs easily into your case and daypack. Sunglasses are also essential.

WHAT FOOTWEAR DO YOU RECOMMEND FOR WALKING?

We strongly recommend wearing proper hiking boots or shoes as they provide added ankle support. One thing is for sure if you buy a new pair of walking boots/shoes make sure you break them in before you come on holiday.

Here are some further considerations:

Boots versus walking shoes – that’s largely an issue of personal preference. Walking shoes don’t provide anywhere near as much ankle support as boots though.

The weight of the footwear is important. You only need something suitable for day hikes on tracks – not to climb Mt Everest in! There’s an old saying that 100 grams on your feet is equivalent to 500 on your back.

The shoes should wrap around the foot with an even, snug hold over all parts of your foot. You should look for comfort across the balls of the feet. Your toes should not press together or touch the end of the boot – this is especially important for downhill walking. Your heel should not move inside the boot when you walk. And a laced up boot should not put pressure on the top of your foot or hurt your ankle.

Leather has been the long-time favourite with many walkers but these days leather is generally only used in heavier boots, which are mostly not necessary for day walks. Most light – medium-weight boots are of good quality and have synthetic uppers. These are durable but do not keep the water out. If you can pay some more, have a look at boots with a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex. The membrane is a very clever product built into the boot material so, though it can’t be seen, it lasts for the life of the boot. Dry feet will be more comfortable, smell less, and be less likely to blister if conditions get tough.

The soles of the boots are extremely important. Look for soles that are thick enough to protect your feet against sharp rocks that might press into the sole, and with a chunky pattern that will provide better grip on slippery tracks. A Vibram sole is good quality – look for the yellow brand on the sole of the boots.

Finally, we often see people who are wearing cheap, ill-fitting, loose, sloppy socks, which is an absolute recipe for disaster! Wear socks that fit firmly. Spend that bit extra and buy socks with shaped heels and good cushioning – your feet with thank you at the end of the day! Some people like to wear one pair of socks, others prefer two pair…..it is up to you. Once again, avoid loose socks that are too big.

DO YOU RECOMMEND GAITERS FOR THIS TRIP?

We don’t believe gaiters are essential for this walk, however, you may decide otherwise. Gaiters are designed to keep rain, grass seeds, sand, mud, leeches and other unwanted items out of the top of your boots. They come in a full range of sizes from huge mountaineering styles through to short, lightweight ones. Most of them wrap over the boot laces, around the tops of boots and upwards over the lower part of your legs.

Sensible, practical gaiters should have some stiffness, so they will sit upright around the lower part of your legs, and not slip down. Also, they should go on and off without needing to remove your boots. Gaiters also provide useful leg & sock protection whenever there are scratchy plants over the track or grasses full of seeds.

DO YOU RECOMMEND WALKING POLES FOR THIS TRIP?

Yes we do. More and more walkers are discovering the benefits of using one or two walking poles. Poles can provide valuable support when walking on uneven ground, or where there is an elevation. They can significantly reduce jarring on knees and ankles when walking downhill.

There are several different styles of handles, so you can find a comfortable grip. Look for a stick with a spring mechanism built into it, which will reduce jarring on wrists and elbows. Your new poles will no doubt travel in your suitcase so make sure it collapses small enough to fit. Everyone can benefit from the use of walking poles, for walking further, exercising/strengthening the upper body and relieving the pounding on the knees and other joints.

WILL I HAVE TO CARRY A HEAVY PACK?

All of our holidays are pack free experiences with all the logistics being organised for you. All your luggage will be moved for you so you won’t need to carry a heavy pack. All you will need to carry with you is your day pack.

WHAT IS AN IDEAL DAY PACK FOR WALKING?

The best piece of advice we can give is to make sure it’s big enough! As a minimum, you need to fit in your lunch, water bottle/s, wet weather gear, warm jumper, camera and other personal bits and pieces. A larger pack weighs marginally more and costs very little extra and you’re unlikely to regret it.

Well-padded shoulder straps are a must as your pack is inevitably going to feel heavier as the day goes on. Padded waist/hip belts are also very useful as they help take some of the load off your shoulders. A chest strap is available on most good packs these days and it will stop the pack from sliding around on your back whilst you bend over or walk on uneven terrain.

Several pockets or sections can also be handy, allowing you quick access to things like sunscreen, your water bottle or snacks.

Most packs are not waterproof, so it’s always a good idea to line the pack with a heavy-duty plastic bag. You can also buy a pack cover, which does an excellent job of keeping most of the rain out.

Some daypacks have a curved back and this allows more air to circulate, a fabulous idea for comfort. Whilst other hikers have wet backs, with one of these daypacks your back will remain dry.

DO YOU RECOMMEND TRAVEL INSURANCE?

Please remember that it is far better to have travel insurance than not, particularly if you find yourself in the unfortunate position of having to cancel the walk. This way, you are covered.

 

While our Auswalk and/or service partners do all that we can to ensure that you and your possessions are safe and well-cared-for throughout your holiday, accidents can occasionally happen. It is your responsibility to ensure that any luggage being transported between accommodations along the trail is safely packed and does not contain any valuable and/or fragile items such as laptops, tablets, cameras, mobile phones or glass. Please protect yourself and your luggage and its contents with a suitable holiday insurance policy.

This insurance should also cover non-refundable costs should you have to cancel your trip due to unexpected personal circumstances.

5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE WALKING THE 3 CAPES

1. The 3 Capes region on the Tasman Peninsula is more than just walking destination.

There’ plenty to do on the Tasman Peninsula and there are a couple of main attractions outside of hiking that are worth a visit.

The Port Arthur Historic site is world heritage listed and probably one of the best-preserved penal settlements worldwide. The gardens are as equally beautiful. As are the views over the ocean. You can easily spend a day wandering the buildings: there’s also guided tours on offer, including one centred on ghosts.

When on the Tasman Peninsula, one of the highlights is to get on the water. If you enter Port Arthur as part of your ticket price, there’s a 30 min cruise on the water. But if you want more than that, Pennicott express otherwise known as Tasman Island Cruises, a fabulous option to ‘leisurely’ cruise around the Tasman Sea.

There’s also the Lavender Farm, the dog line at Eaglehawk Neck and various small walks outside of the 3 Capes track like The Teselated Pavement, Devils Kitchen, Tasman Arch and the blowhole to explor

2. The offiicial 3 Capes Track is actually only 2 Capes.

The third Cape, namely Cape Raoul is equally as spectacular and is quite separate from the main Three Capes Track. The walk is superb as are the views. Cape Raoul is also home to Shipsterns Bluff which has a massive reputation as a big surf destination. Plenty of surfers have met their match (no one has died according to locals) on what is one of the heaviest (and gnarliest) waves in the world. The other 2 Capes are Cape Huay and Cape Pillar; all of the capes are unique in their own way.

3. Make sure you prepare for hiking before you come

To start with the walks involve some up and down. Suitable training is absolutely necessary if you are not already walking fit. It is vital you practice walking up and down hills. For many walkers banging out 20kms is no issue, but once they get on an incline they unravell. Walking up is an entirely different kettle of fish. Walking up hill uses a different muscle range in your legs (and glutes if you still have them, they can get weak as we get older). That’s why our legs freak out when you climb stairs.

Make sure you break in your shoes if you have to purchase new ones. Blisters are the number one injury on walking tracks and new shoes are often the issue. Blisters don’t sound like much, but they can ruin a walk and there isn’t much you can do if the shoes don’t fit or haven’t been worm in.

4. What to bring when walking the 3 Capes track

What you pack is somewhat dependent on 2 things. What your intending to from a walking perspective and the time of year.

There are many options, including doing the Tasmania National Parks walk and staying in their huts. You need to book online on their website. If your choice is to stay in comfortable accommodation and dine out and walk, then a walking holiday might eb a good idea.

Needless to say you will need a backpack regardless to carry your gear. If you’re slack packing as we like to call it, walking with a day pack and getting picked up each day and taken back to accommodation your pack will be much smaller and lighter. If you’re going on the hut walk please see this site for the additional gear you’ll need to bring.

What’s common ground though is the following.: The need for good wet weather gear, especially a gortex jacket. Good walking shoes or boots are a must and at least 2 litres of water, 3 in summer as there is no water on the tracks.

I strongly recommend using hiking poles on the 3 Capes walks. Most of the walks on the 3 Capes have a lot of up and down and they will be a big help with stability and fatigue. Using poles has been said will ensure another 15 years of knee use before replacement! See this article for more information if you’re interested.

From a safety perspective, a mobile phone fully charged and a backup battery are vital. With Emergency + app loaded on your phone, you can be tracked anywhere by rescuers, actually within 8 metres. The app also allows you to communicate with emergency services and assist rescuers if heavens forbid you run into any problems.

You will need some means of navigation and detailed maps of the walks you intend of doing. And don’t rely on technology as there copious stories of people relying on tech and it failing and having no means of navigation. Don’t forget a fail includes dropping your phone, losing it or running out of battery. Its happens a lot.

Lastly, a warm jumper is essential as is a sunhat, sunscreen (at least 30+), a first aid kit and toilet paper.

Whether or not to carry some of the following will be dependent on the weather conditions. By the way check the weather the night before walking and in the morning. I can get be really hot or really cold and windy, so both have to be considered in whether walking is feasible (fortunately this doesn’t happen often). In any case bringing waterproof overtrousers may save the day if it is wet as will be a warm hat. Sunglasses, camera, matches and a small torch are also worth packing. One last thing, I always carry a version of nappy rash cream, or a ( a rash powder), if its hot and you have solid legs it can make or break a walk. Also a must is Campeed for blisters. DO NOT leave home with out it.

There is more information on what to bring in the above FAQ section of this page.

5. You need to take your time

Take your time, be present, give your self the gift of doing very little. Take a book, an easel if you must or your drawing pad. Write something that not work-related. Sit back and enjoy the view, if its not at our lodging then there’s magic places along the Tasman Peninsula all over the place to sit and enjoy the serenity. To factor in extra time to sit and chill on the track, so you will need to do your research on the walks to make this happen. Breathe in the freshest air in the world, air that has travelled up from Antarctica (by the way the Great Ocean walk also has the freshest air in the world as does Portland in Victoria). It reminds me a bit of the oldest town in Victoria, all 3 of them. What is guaranteed is that the air is fresh, but who’s to know what wins the freshest air competition. Does it even matter. Enjoy your exploration of Tasman Peninsula.

climate/weather

The climate on the Tasman Peninsula and the Three Capes is temperate.

The 3 Capes self-guided walking holidays is available year-round. However, October through to May are a more suitable and popular time to walk.  This is still a lovely time for walking, but it is Tasmania so your need to be prepared with at least a good quality wet weather jacket. Our local guides who live on the Island swear that June and July are also good times to walk also as the weather is often crisp and there is no one around. Please see our What To Bring section in FAQ’s for more information.

For more information please see the Bureau of Meteorology’s information concerning average temperatures and rainfall levels throughout the year.

 

cLIMATE GRAPHT 3 cAPES tASMAN pENINSULA

walking essentials

As with any journey, it is essential to be prepared for your walking holiday. While we will be transporting your luggage from accommodation to accommodation, you will still be carrying a lightweight day pack with you. Here is what we suggest that you carry with you each day:

  • Walking notes, a map, and a map case
  • Picnic lunch packed in an insulated container (when supplied)
  • Quality waterproof jacket with a hood
  • Warm jumper or jacket
  • Sunhat
  • Comfortable walking shoes
  • Sunscreen (at least 15+)
  • 1 to 2 litres of water
  • First aid kit
  • Toilet paper
  • Some money
  • Mobile phone (please note that reception is not available in all walk areas)
  • Personal insect repellent, band-aids, and a small container of salt mixed with rice grains
  • Personal necessities (example: required medication)

Now that we have the essentials packed, it is time to think of those additional items that may be worth packing along with you. These may include and are not limited to:

  • Waterproof over-trousers
  • Warm hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Camera (with an extra battery or sim cards)
  • Binoculars
  • Notebook and pen
  • Matches
  • Small torch
  • Walking stick
  • Thermos (for hot drinks)
  • Additional snacks

Travel in Tasmania

Cape Raoul

Cape Raoul was named by the French explorer, Bruni d’Entrecasteaux for the pilot of his expedition, Joseph Francois Raoul. This French team visited Tasmania’s east coast in 1792 while searching for the lost French expedition of La Pérouse (which had come to grief in the Solomon Islands, but this wasn’t discovered until decades later).

 

Dolomieu Point

Dolomieu Point was named by the d’Entrecasteaux Expedition in honour of the French mineralogist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu (1750 – 1801). This is also who the Italian Dolomites are named for!

Cape Hauy

The dolomite columns at Cape Hauy, at the east end of the Tasman Peninsula, were likened to a rank of organ pipes and named after the respected French scientist and mineralogist, Hauy.

Port Arthur

Port Arthur, the former penal colony is now one of Tasmanians iconic tourism destinations. It is located in between Cape Pillar and Cape Raoul near Carnarvon Bay.  It was named after George Arthur the lieutenant governer of Van Diemens Land. The settlement first started in 1830 as a timber station and morphed into a penal colony.

Cape Pillar

Cape Pillar is one of the 3 stand out capes (there are a few other capes) on the Tasman Peninsula. The Cape Pillar cliffs rise to 300m high.  The later sections of the Cape Pillar Track follow the newly established Three Capes Track which can be done as a day walk but it is over 30km long.

Overview

OVERVIEW

Auswalk will provide you with all the comforts you need to have a splendid walk and relaxing experience. You can choose either a self-guided or group-guided Three Capes walking holiday. You will stay in our favourite accommodations, taste the delicious fresh produce of the region. You get to traverse the trails with nothing more than a light day pack, and we will take care of the rest.

Auswalk provides two self-guided and two guided Three Capes walking holidays for your pleasure. Effectively Auswalk provides a lot more as they can customize any of their walks to suit, adding more or taking away days to suit each walker’s specialised needs.

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Flora & Fauna

Flora & Fauna

FLORA

The pine-like trees on the track with woody nuts are Tasmanian Native Cypress Pines (Callitris rhomboidea) – the scientific name describes the interesting shape of the nuts quite well! You may also encounter Yellow-Tailed Black Cockatoos in this area. These fabulous birds mainly eat seeds including gum trees, banksias, hakeas, and grass trees. They also dismember seed cones looking for wood-boring insects. The birds here belong to a subspecies found only in Tasmania (Calyptorhynchus funereus xanthanotus).

The exposed, rocky high points on the 3 Capes Track are dominated by hardy alpine shrubs like Pinkberries and other heath species. In January, the track may be lined with pink wildflowers. These are Trigger Plants (Stylidium). The name refers to the pollination mechanism of the flowers. When an insect lands on one of the blooms, their weight triggers the spring-loaded white “floral column” (fused stigma + anthers) to dab it with pollen, & at the same time reciprocally collect any pollen that the insect may already be carrying. The tall, spindly looking plants alonmg the walk, with strappy leaves arranged in spiral clusters are Pineapple Candleheath, a Tasmanian alpine endemic (Richea dracophylla).

You will also see many conifer-like trees with long, thin, drooping green branches on the last section of the walk. Depending on the season, these trees may have small, fleshy, red-orange fruits with a green seed embedded in them. These are known as Native Cherriesalso (Exocarpus cupressiformis) which are edible when ripe. Give one a try when you are there! They really are quite tasty.

You will likely see many Banksias in flower on the Tasman Peninsula. These are Silver Banksias (B. marginata – also found in VIC, NSW, ACT, and SA). They may grow up to 9m in height but will start to produce flowers as soon as they are over 1m tall. Silver Banksias are significant producers of nectar for birds and insects in this region. You will hear the “eee-gypt” call of the Crescent Honeyeater around the Banksias.

FAUNA

The Tasman Peninsula and the 3 Capes area is a haven for wildlife from the tiniest of Pygmy possums to wombats,  Seals,  Whales, Dolphins, Tasmanian Devils and wallabies.

Long-Nosed Fur Seals (Arctocephalus forsteri) are becoming more common to the area now they are not hunted. Approx. 75 – 100 individuals may be hauled out here. During the 1800s, these fur seals were hunted almost to extinction for their thick fur coats. They are now slowly recovering. This species is found in Tasmania, Western Australia, South Australia, and New Zealand. In Tasmanian waters, it mainly occurs on the west and south coasts. Only a small number of long-nosed fur seals (also sometimes known as the New Zealand fur seal) breed on remote islands off the south coast. The total population in Tasmania is 350 – 450. About 100 pups are born annually. Australia-wide, the population is estimated to be 58,000. Their main prey includes redbait, jack mackerel, and lantern fish. They also eat seabirds such as little penguins and shearwaters.

There are two wallaby species in the peninsula, the endemic Tasmanian pademelon found nowhere else on earth and Bennetts wallabies. They are easy to spot as you walk as their numbers are fairly high now that they are protected.

The Tasmanian bettong and Long-nosed potoroo, also both macropods, are more likely to be seen at night, possibly around your accommodations. Macropods are the common name given to marsupials that generally have largish hind legs.

Through the day you are likely to spot Echidnas, Blue-tongue lizards sunning themselves and a wide variety of other fauna. Echidnas are monotremes, egg laying mammals, the other being platypus. Their spiky exterior is the defence to any threat from predators.

Birdlife includes Tasmanian rosellas, Tasmanian native hens and White-bellied sea eagles which breed on the peninsula. If you look hard owls and tawny frogmouth roosting in the trees, even through the day.

Common wombats are prolific in the area, although generally nocturnal, they can be seen before dusk scratching away searching and foraging for food. A koala’s closest living relative they can actually grow up to 1.3m long and weigh up to 35 kgs. Interestingly they have been clocked running at speeds of 40 km per hour and their poo is cube-shaped.

Tasmanian devils have a fearsome reputation but they are actually shy. These were reintroduced by Tasmanian Parks. They are a marsupial with sharp teeth and an otherwordly howl, which led to them to being called a devil by the early settlers. Devils are carnivores and can weigh up to 14kgs, however they mostly eat carrion, but they do hunt down snakes, birds, insects and fish.

Lastly, it is worth mentioning the common brushtail and ringtail possums, they are loving it on the peninsula, with limited predation, previously mostly by humans, they are easy to spot in the evening in eucalypt trees that surround the accommodations.

 

FAQ

FAQ

WHERE IS THE THREE CAPES WALK LOCATED?

The Three Capes walk is on the Tasman Peninsula, which is located in the south-east of Tasmania. On the way to the peninsula, you will drive through some of Tasmania’s rich heritage, rolling vineyards and hills. It is approximately 100 kms from CBD Hobart a travel time of about 90 minutes by vehicle.

Please Note: The official Three Capes Track route does not go to all three Capes, just two of them, we also only walk to two of the Capes. Please read the itinerary or see the Highlights for further information.

WHAT LEVEL OF FITNESS DO YOU RECOMMEND?

We expect people to have a reasonable level of fitness. Regular physical exercise in the lead up to the trip is recommended. This can be from walking, cycling, going to the gym or a combination of these. You will walk an average of 11kms each day. Some of the walking has an up and down component, mixed in with flat and undulating sections of track. If you exercise regularly, have a moderate to good walking fitness level and feel capable of walking up to 5 to 6 hours a day, this walk is for you.

HOW CHALLENGING IS THE WALK?

Most of the tracks are in first rate condition. Some of the walks include sections of walking up and down again, but this is compensated by shorter walking distances overall. Full day walks average 10-15 kms. There are great opportunities for fit walkers to challenge themselves as there is plenty of additional walking that you can take up.

DO YOU HAVE AN INCENTIVE PROGRAM?

Walking with Auswalk gives you exclusive access to our incentive program. We love our Auswalkers and want to make it easy for you to return for another holiday. Here’s what we offer:

  1. Frequent Walker Points: Just by going on a holiday with us, you will earn 100 Frequent Walker Points which you can redeem for a $100 discount (per person) off your next Auswalk trip. These points are valid for 2 years. If you use your points on a new booking of a value greater than $2300 per person, and within 2 months of completing your previous holiday, we will double the points for you. This means that you will have 200 Frequent Walker Points to redeem as a $200 discount (per person) off your new booking. Please note: You can only use a maximum of 1 set of double points ($200) per new booking and points can’t be used in conjunction with any other offer.
  2. Save if your group is 5 or more with a 5% discount for all walkers. Full payment will be invoiced when booking. At the time of final payment the discount will be applied when the numbers are confirmed. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer.

 

DO I HAVE TO PAY A SINGLE SUPPLEMENT FEE IF I'M A SOLO WALKER?

Australian hotel accommodations (like the ones we use) charge the same, or just about the same price, regardless of whether there is one or two people in the room. This means that to cover the cost of the accommodation for your trip we do need to pass on a single supplement surcharge. This isn’t a cost that we make any margin on and it is simply to cover the fact that the total room cost isn’t being apportioned over two walkers.

CAN YOU RECOMMEND ANY PRE/POST WALK ACCOMMODATION?

There are numerous accommodations in Hobart. We suggest staying close to Salamanca Place and the waterfront. The options are vast and will depend entirely on your budget.

 

You may also like to visit the TripAdvisor and search for other options to best suit your budget and lifestyle.

WHAT LEVEL OF ACCOMMODATION DO YOU PROVIDE?

All the accommodations have been chosen to reflect the character of the region. Accommodations will range from small local hotels to lodges; you can be assured that wherever you stay, you will be warmly welcomed. Most importantly, the accommodations are in great locations and have all the necessary facilities to make your stay as comfortable as possible.

WHAT WILL BE INCLUDED IN MY PRE-DEPARTURE PACK?

You will receive an information pack before departure, including:

  • Map, Map case, luggage tag and pen
  • Insulated lunch bag, expandable lunch box, reusable cutlery and other useful bits and pieces
  • Comprehensive track notes developed by and authored by Auswalk with all the detail that will be needed to walk the Three Capes Walk.

CAN YOU CATER FOR SPECIAL DIETARY REQUIREMENTS?

On our walks, we can cater for specific dietary requirements. Please kindly provide this information when completing your booking form and only provide us with a list of your allergies or those food items that you absolutely cannot eat.

WILL I HAVE WI-FI ACCESS?

Wi-Fi access will be available at the accommodations along the track.

WHAT WILL THE WEATHER BE LIKE?

See the Bureau of Meteorology for information about temperatures and rainfall ahead of time to ensure proper clothing. Spring and autumn are a great time to walk on the Tasman Peninsula. Summer can be a little warmer but with average temperatures of only 18 degrees. Winter is often written off as a time not to visit Tasmanian, let alone walk because of the rain. Layers will be your best friend in these parts. However, if you look at the mean average rainfall it isn’t that much more than in summer. The average temperature in winter does, however, fall to 11 degrees so come prepared with warm clothes and good rain gear (realistically year round). See gear advice section in FAQ’s for more information.

WHAT WILDLIFE MAY I ENCOUNTER IN THIS REGION?

An abundance of animals and birds exist in this region. Wallabies, echidnas, wombats, pygmy, brushtail and ringtail possums, the Tasmanian bettong, long nosed potoroo, blue tongue lizards and Tasmanian devils (they are actually quite shy) to name a few.

Bird life includes Tasmanian rosellas, Tasmanian native hens and White-bellied sea eagles which breed on the peninsula.

Snakes are also most likely to be around in the summer months. They will usually move away from the sound and vibration of human activity. Did you know that Tasmania has only 3 species of snakes? Tiger, lowland copperhead and white-lipped snakes.

HOW IMPORTANT IS IT TO KEEP TO THE WALKING TRACKS?

By keeping to the walking track it reduces erosion, protects native vegetation and the spread of cinnamon fungus (it is a lethal disease that has serious consequences for many Australian habitats). You are also less likely to have a close encounter with snakes, ants, leeches, wasps, bees and ticks.

WHAT ARE YOUR LUGGAGE REQUIREMENTS?

You are allowed up to 23kgs of luggage, please no heavier as it may cause problems. Please also be aware that you may have to move your luggage to and from your room on some occasions, however, your luggage is transferred while you walk.

WILL I NEED WATERPROOF CLOTHING?

A waterproof jacket is ideal. It serves two functions – to keep you dry and to keep the wind out. Cheaper plastic or nylon raincoats are good for keeping the rain out, but unfortunately, they do not breathe meaning that you’ll still get wet from condensation and not really suitable for any walk.

By far the best jackets are made from waterproof and breathable fabrics such as Gore-Tex. These wick your body moisture through the Gore-Tex material to the outside of the jacket through one-way pores. Goretex and other similar jackets aren’t cheap, but most of the quality outdoor equipment stores have sales where prices can often be reduced by substantial amounts. And they last a lifetime! Your waterproof jacket is a practical item, designed to keep you warm, dry and comfortable in the bush and warm in areas where there is a risk of being cold.

WHAT CLOTHING SHOULD I PACK FOR COLD CONDITIONS?

Depending on the time of year you are visiting it can get quite cold, especially at night. A warm jumper is a must. The best material these days is polar fleece or equivalents as they are lightweight and dry very quickly if they get wet. Wool, on the other hand, is heavy and takes a long time to dry. Cotton is not appropriate. A warm hat is also desirable. Did you know that you lose 40% of your body heat through your head? So if you’re feeling cold, don a hat and feel the difference.

WHAT CLOTHING SHOULD I PACK FOR WALKING THROUGHOUT THE DAY?

We recommend thin synthetic materials for walking. Cotton can get damp from perspiration.

Shirts should have collars and sleeves to help prevent sunburn. Long sleeves that can be either rolled up or rolled down are a good idea. Light colours will keep you cooler. Specialist shirts have vents to allow for airflow.

Shorts are great for hot weather, but remember to use plenty of sunscreen. Long trousers are great for sun protection and also for cooler weather. Trousers that have “zip off” legs are a good compromise.

A sun hat is essential. Choose a hat with a brim all the way round as this keeps off more heat and sun than either baseball caps or a soft floppy cotton hats. Good hats also come with some mesh ventilation in the middle and a chinstrap to keep it on when the wind blows. Choose a hat that packs easily into your case and daypack. Sunglasses are also essential.

WHAT FOOTWEAR DO YOU RECOMMEND FOR WALKING?

We strongly recommend wearing proper hiking boots or shoes as they provide added ankle support. One thing is for sure if you buy a new pair of walking boots/shoes make sure you break them in before you come on holiday.

Here are some further considerations:

Boots versus walking shoes – that’s largely an issue of personal preference. Walking shoes don’t provide anywhere near as much ankle support as boots though.

The weight of the footwear is important. You only need something suitable for day hikes on tracks – not to climb Mt Everest in! There’s an old saying that 100 grams on your feet is equivalent to 500 on your back.

The shoes should wrap around the foot with an even, snug hold over all parts of your foot. You should look for comfort across the balls of the feet. Your toes should not press together or touch the end of the boot – this is especially important for downhill walking. Your heel should not move inside the boot when you walk. And a laced up boot should not put pressure on the top of your foot or hurt your ankle.

Leather has been the long-time favourite with many walkers but these days leather is generally only used in heavier boots, which are mostly not necessary for day walks. Most light – medium-weight boots are of good quality and have synthetic uppers. These are durable but do not keep the water out. If you can pay some more, have a look at boots with a waterproof membrane such as Gore-Tex. The membrane is a very clever product built into the boot material so, though it can’t be seen, it lasts for the life of the boot. Dry feet will be more comfortable, smell less, and be less likely to blister if conditions get tough.

The soles of the boots are extremely important. Look for soles that are thick enough to protect your feet against sharp rocks that might press into the sole, and with a chunky pattern that will provide better grip on slippery tracks. A Vibram sole is good quality – look for the yellow brand on the sole of the boots.

Finally, we often see people who are wearing cheap, ill-fitting, loose, sloppy socks, which is an absolute recipe for disaster! Wear socks that fit firmly. Spend that bit extra and buy socks with shaped heels and good cushioning – your feet with thank you at the end of the day! Some people like to wear one pair of socks, others prefer two pair…..it is up to you. Once again, avoid loose socks that are too big.

DO YOU RECOMMEND GAITERS FOR THIS TRIP?

We don’t believe gaiters are essential for this walk, however, you may decide otherwise. Gaiters are designed to keep rain, grass seeds, sand, mud, leeches and other unwanted items out of the top of your boots. They come in a full range of sizes from huge mountaineering styles through to short, lightweight ones. Most of them wrap over the boot laces, around the tops of boots and upwards over the lower part of your legs.

Sensible, practical gaiters should have some stiffness, so they will sit upright around the lower part of your legs, and not slip down. Also, they should go on and off without needing to remove your boots. Gaiters also provide useful leg & sock protection whenever there are scratchy plants over the track or grasses full of seeds.

DO YOU RECOMMEND WALKING POLES FOR THIS TRIP?

Yes we do. More and more walkers are discovering the benefits of using one or two walking poles. Poles can provide valuable support when walking on uneven ground, or where there is an elevation. They can significantly reduce jarring on knees and ankles when walking downhill.

There are several different styles of handles, so you can find a comfortable grip. Look for a stick with a spring mechanism built into it, which will reduce jarring on wrists and elbows. Your new poles will no doubt travel in your suitcase so make sure it collapses small enough to fit. Everyone can benefit from the use of walking poles, for walking further, exercising/strengthening the upper body and relieving the pounding on the knees and other joints.

WILL I HAVE TO CARRY A HEAVY PACK?

All of our holidays are pack free experiences with all the logistics being organised for you. All your luggage will be moved for you so you won’t need to carry a heavy pack. All you will need to carry with you is your day pack.

WHAT IS AN IDEAL DAY PACK FOR WALKING?

The best piece of advice we can give is to make sure it’s big enough! As a minimum, you need to fit in your lunch, water bottle/s, wet weather gear, warm jumper, camera and other personal bits and pieces. A larger pack weighs marginally more and costs very little extra and you’re unlikely to regret it.

Well-padded shoulder straps are a must as your pack is inevitably going to feel heavier as the day goes on. Padded waist/hip belts are also very useful as they help take some of the load off your shoulders. A chest strap is available on most good packs these days and it will stop the pack from sliding around on your back whilst you bend over or walk on uneven terrain.

Several pockets or sections can also be handy, allowing you quick access to things like sunscreen, your water bottle or snacks.

Most packs are not waterproof, so it’s always a good idea to line the pack with a heavy-duty plastic bag. You can also buy a pack cover, which does an excellent job of keeping most of the rain out.

Some daypacks have a curved back and this allows more air to circulate, a fabulous idea for comfort. Whilst other hikers have wet backs, with one of these daypacks your back will remain dry.

DO YOU RECOMMEND TRAVEL INSURANCE?

Please remember that it is far better to have travel insurance than not, particularly if you find yourself in the unfortunate position of having to cancel the walk. This way, you are covered.

 

While our Auswalk and/or service partners do all that we can to ensure that you and your possessions are safe and well-cared-for throughout your holiday, accidents can occasionally happen. It is your responsibility to ensure that any luggage being transported between accommodations along the trail is safely packed and does not contain any valuable and/or fragile items such as laptops, tablets, cameras, mobile phones or glass. Please protect yourself and your luggage and its contents with a suitable holiday insurance policy.

This insurance should also cover non-refundable costs should you have to cancel your trip due to unexpected personal circumstances.

5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE WALKING THE 3 CAPES

5 THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW BEFORE WALKING THE 3 CAPES

1. 1. The 3 Capes region on the Tasman Peninsula is more than just walking destination.

There’ plenty to do on the Tasman Peninsula and there are a couple of main attractions outside of hiking that are worth a visit.

The Port Arthur Historic site is world heritage listed and probably one of the best-preserved penal settlements worldwide. The gardens are as equally beautiful. As are the views over the ocean. You can easily spend a day wandering the buildings: there’s also guided tours on offer, including one centred on ghosts.

When on the Tasman Peninsula, one of the highlights is to get on the water. If you enter Port Arthur as part of your ticket price, there’s a 30 min cruise on the water. But if you want more than that, Pennicott express otherwise known as Tasman Island Cruises, a fabulous option to ‘leisurely’ cruise around the Tasman Sea.

There’s also the Lavender Farm, the dog line at Eaglehawk Neck and various small walks outside of the 3 Capes track like The Teselated Pavement, Devils Kitchen, Tasman Arch and the blowhole to explor

2. 2. The offiicial 3 Capes Track is actually only 2 Capes.

The third Cape, namely Cape Raoul is equally as spectacular and is quite separate from the main Three Capes Track. The walk is superb as are the views. Cape Raoul is also home to Shipsterns Bluff which has a massive reputation as a big surf destination. Plenty of surfers have met their match (no one has died according to locals) on what is one of the heaviest (and gnarliest) waves in the world. The other 2 Capes are Cape Huay and Cape Pillar; all of the capes are unique in their own way.

3. 3. Make sure you prepare for hiking before you come

To start with the walks involve some up and down. Suitable training is absolutely necessary if you are not already walking fit. It is vital you practice walking up and down hills. For many walkers banging out 20kms is no issue, but once they get on an incline they unravell. Walking up is an entirely different kettle of fish. Walking up hill uses a different muscle range in your legs (and glutes if you still have them, they can get weak as we get older). That’s why our legs freak out when you climb stairs.

Make sure you break in your shoes if you have to purchase new ones. Blisters are the number one injury on walking tracks and new shoes are often the issue. Blisters don’t sound like much, but they can ruin a walk and there isn’t much you can do if the shoes don’t fit or haven’t been worm in.

4. 4. What to bring when walking the 3 Capes track

What you pack is somewhat dependent on 2 things. What your intending to from a walking perspective and the time of year.

There are many options, including doing the Tasmania National Parks walk and staying in their huts. You need to book online on their website. If your choice is to stay in comfortable accommodation and dine out and walk, then a walking holiday might eb a good idea.

Needless to say you will need a backpack regardless to carry your gear. If you’re slack packing as we like to call it, walking with a day pack and getting picked up each day and taken back to accommodation your pack will be much smaller and lighter. If you’re going on the hut walk please see this site for the additional gear you’ll need to bring.

What’s common ground though is the following.: The need for good wet weather gear, especially a gortex jacket. Good walking shoes or boots are a must and at least 2 litres of water, 3 in summer as there is no water on the tracks.

I strongly recommend using hiking poles on the 3 Capes walks. Most of the walks on the 3 Capes have a lot of up and down and they will be a big help with stability and fatigue. Using poles has been said will ensure another 15 years of knee use before replacement! See this article for more information if you’re interested.

From a safety perspective, a mobile phone fully charged and a backup battery are vital. With Emergency + app loaded on your phone, you can be tracked anywhere by rescuers, actually within 8 metres. The app also allows you to communicate with emergency services and assist rescuers if heavens forbid you run into any problems.

You will need some means of navigation and detailed maps of the walks you intend of doing. And don’t rely on technology as there copious stories of people relying on tech and it failing and having no means of navigation. Don’t forget a fail includes dropping your phone, losing it or running out of battery. Its happens a lot.

Lastly, a warm jumper is essential as is a sunhat, sunscreen (at least 30+), a first aid kit and toilet paper.

Whether or not to carry some of the following will be dependent on the weather conditions. By the way check the weather the night before walking and in the morning. I can get be really hot or really cold and windy, so both have to be considered in whether walking is feasible (fortunately this doesn’t happen often). In any case bringing waterproof overtrousers may save the day if it is wet as will be a warm hat. Sunglasses, camera, matches and a small torch are also worth packing. One last thing, I always carry a version of nappy rash cream, or a ( a rash powder), if its hot and you have solid legs it can make or break a walk. Also a must is Campeed for blisters. DO NOT leave home with out it.

There is more information on what to bring in the above FAQ section of this page.

5. 5. You need to take your time

Take your time, be present, give your self the gift of doing very little. Take a book, an easel if you must or your drawing pad. Write something that not work-related. Sit back and enjoy the view, if its not at our lodging then there’s magic places along the Tasman Peninsula all over the place to sit and enjoy the serenity. To factor in extra time to sit and chill on the track, so you will need to do your research on the walks to make this happen. Breathe in the freshest air in the world, air that has travelled up from Antarctica (by the way the Great Ocean walk also has the freshest air in the world as does Portland in Victoria). It reminds me a bit of the oldest town in Victoria, all 3 of them. What is guaranteed is that the air is fresh, but who’s to know what wins the freshest air competition. Does it even matter. Enjoy your exploration of Tasman Peninsula.

climate/weather

climate/weather

The climate on the Tasman Peninsula and the Three Capes is temperate.

The 3 Capes self-guided walking holidays is available year-round. However, October through to May are a more suitable and popular time to walk.  This is still a lovely time for walking, but it is Tasmania so your need to be prepared with at least a good quality wet weather jacket. Our local guides who live on the Island swear that June and July are also good times to walk also as the weather is often crisp and there is no one around. Please see our What To Bring section in FAQ’s for more information.

For more information please see the Bureau of Meteorology’s information concerning average temperatures and rainfall levels throughout the year.

 

cLIMATE GRAPHT 3 cAPES tASMAN pENINSULA

walking essentials

walking essentials

As with any journey, it is essential to be prepared for your walking holiday. While we will be transporting your luggage from accommodation to accommodation, you will still be carrying a lightweight day pack with you. Here is what we suggest that you carry with you each day:

  • Walking notes, a map, and a map case
  • Picnic lunch packed in an insulated container (when supplied)
  • Quality waterproof jacket with a hood
  • Warm jumper or jacket
  • Sunhat
  • Comfortable walking shoes
  • Sunscreen (at least 15+)
  • 1 to 2 litres of water
  • First aid kit
  • Toilet paper
  • Some money
  • Mobile phone (please note that reception is not available in all walk areas)
  • Personal insect repellent, band-aids, and a small container of salt mixed with rice grains
  • Personal necessities (example: required medication)

Now that we have the essentials packed, it is time to think of those additional items that may be worth packing along with you. These may include and are not limited to:

  • Waterproof over-trousers
  • Warm hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Camera (with an extra battery or sim cards)
  • Binoculars
  • Notebook and pen
  • Matches
  • Small torch
  • Walking stick
  • Thermos (for hot drinks)
  • Additional snacks
Travel in Tasmania

Travel in Tasmania

Cape Raoul

Cape Raoul was named by the French explorer, Bruni d’Entrecasteaux for the pilot of his expedition, Joseph Francois Raoul. This French team visited Tasmania’s east coast in 1792 while searching for the lost French expedition of La Pérouse (which had come to grief in the Solomon Islands, but this wasn’t discovered until decades later).

 

Dolomieu Point

Dolomieu Point was named by the d’Entrecasteaux Expedition in honour of the French mineralogist Déodat Gratet de Dolomieu (1750 – 1801). This is also who the Italian Dolomites are named for!

Cape Hauy

The dolomite columns at Cape Hauy, at the east end of the Tasman Peninsula, were likened to a rank of organ pipes and named after the respected French scientist and mineralogist, Hauy.

Port Arthur

Port Arthur, the former penal colony is now one of Tasmanians iconic tourism destinations. It is located in between Cape Pillar and Cape Raoul near Carnarvon Bay.  It was named after George Arthur the lieutenant governer of Van Diemens Land. The settlement first started in 1830 as a timber station and morphed into a penal colony.

Cape Pillar

Cape Pillar is one of the 3 stand out capes (there are a few other capes) on the Tasman Peninsula. The Cape Pillar cliffs rise to 300m high.  The later sections of the Cape Pillar Track follow the newly established Three Capes Track which can be done as a day walk but it is over 30km long.

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ENQUIRE NOW

If you’re looking for further information on any of our walking holidays please fill out the enquiry form and we’ll be in touch.

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