OVERVIEW

Challenge yourself to completing the historic, UNESCO-protected Camino Frances, walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela, in 36 days. This is the same walk as the 38 day trip but without rest days.

Since the discovery of Saint James' tomb in the 9th century, pilgrims have walked the 812km route to reach Santiago's spectacular cathedral in Plaza de Obradoiro.  Follow in the footsteps of intrepid pilgrims as you embark on a journey traversing the French Pyrenees and across the rich cultural landscape of northern Spain.

Over 36 days, follow the iconic scallop shell markers through a patchwork of rolling countryside. Explore the medieval historic centres of Leon, Astorga and Pamplona. Hop between tapas bars as you sample the local delicacies. Whether you are walking the Camino for your own spiritual journey or simply for the physical and cultural experience, this world-famous route is one of the most unique long-distance treks in the world.

Highlights

  • Walk the full 812km of the Camino Frances route
  • Hike across the stunning French Pyrenees into Basque country
  • Visit the charming 16th-century town of Pamplona
  • Discover ancient villages and medieval churches
  • Wonder at the architecture of Antoni Gaudi in Leon and Astorga
  • End your journey in Santiago's spectacular Plaza de Obradoiro

WALK OVERVIEW

TYPE OF WALK
SELF GUIDED
TRIP LENGTH
36 DAYS
WALK GRADE
Challenging

Grade 5 - Challenging

Longer, tougher, steeper hill sections, rough surfaces and many steps. Active lifestyle, good fitness and walking experience required.

PRICE FROM
$ 5965

per person twin/double share

SINGLE OCCUPANCY
$ 1935

Accommodations charge the same price per room regardless of whether there are one or two people occupying it. To cover the cost of a room when occupied by one person we need to charge the single occupancy fee.

per person

Book now

ITINERARY

  • Day 1
  • Day 2
  • Day 3
  • Day 4
  • Day 5
  • Day 6
  • Day 7
  • Day 8
  • Day 9
  • Day 10
  • Day 11
  • Day 12
  • Day 13
  • Day 14
  • Day 15
  • Day 16
  • Day 17
  • Day 18
  • Day 19
  • Day 20
  • Day 21
  • Day 22
  • Day 23
  • Day 24
  • Day 25
  • Day 26
  • Day 27
  • Day 28
  • Day 29
  • Day 30
  • Day 31
  • Day 32
  • Day 33
  • Day 34
  • Day 35
  • Day 36

DAY 1
Arrive Saint Jean Pied de Port

On this first day, you can view the sights after being booked in a hotel in the centre of town.

This beautiful walled city is the modern-day starting point for the full Camino Frances route. Nestled in the French Pyrenees, the Spanish border is a mere 8km away. Visit the old prison and the popular Gate of St James as you explore the area. Before leaving, take the time to explore the old medieval walls where you can see the original city gates at either end of the Rue de la Citadelle, the town’s main cobbled street. Later, collect your pilgrim’s passport before your first day of walking tomorrow.

Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Itzalpea

A family home built in 1807, this hotel is located in the heart of French Basque country. The house has a tearoom, where you can order local pastries and cafe au lait. Rooms are comfortable with classic ensuite furnishings.

DAY 2
Walk to Roncesvalles

Begin your Camino walk, following in the footsteps of thousands before you. Departing Saint Jean on foot, head over the old bridge and under the statue of St James, patron saint of Spain. Here, a challenging trail begins to climb to the Roncesvalles Pass (1450m), as you follow the old Napoleonic military route. Guided by the scallop shell waymarkers, cross the border into Spanish Basque country, which is truly unique. Unlike the rest of Spain, the region has its own culinary traditions and a very unique language.

Walk: 25km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Roncevalles

Contemporary rooms are housed in a central medieval building. The dining room still has the original wooden beams, and there is a sun terrace where you can pull up a chair and enjoy a drink before heading to your ensuite room.

DAY 3
Walk to Larrasoaña

With your feet now firmly accustomed to the rhythm of the Camino, head out along a trail lined with oak and beech trees before arriving at the village of Espinal. Today the Camino takes you first to Espinal across amazing mountains, woods and meadows. The view in Espinal is worth seeing with its majestic backdrop of the Pyrenees. You will then pass through the scenic Burgette before making your way to Zubiri, with its Medieval Bridge and serene atmosphere. This sleepy village is a great spot to pick up some provisions before heading over the Alto de Mezquiriz mountain pass. Followed by a steep descent, you will arrive at the village of Zubiri and its medieval Puente de la Rabia (Rabies Bridge). In olden times, the bridge is said to have cured animals of disease if they crossed it three times. Leaving Espinal the route presents another pass to cross, the Alto de Erro. This long but challenging day ends at Larrasoaña or Zubiri.

Walk: 28km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation:  Casa Elita

A family-run bed and breakfast, your host Elita will welcome you after a long day of walking. You can relax in the shared lounge or your ensuite room. Elita is well known for providing great breakfasts with fresh, warm pastries and plentiful supplies of tea and coffee.

DAY 4
Walk to Pamplona

A shorter day today as you head to the lively town of Pamplona, famed for its Running of the Bulls festival. The River Arga guides the way on Day 4 as you follow it past hills covered in a variety of different trees. As you get closer to Pamplona, the rural landscape slowly disappears, passing some smaller towns along the way. Pamplona is a sight to behold and one of the jewels of the Camino Frances. Check out the cathedral, the Citadel of Pamplona, the Museum of Navarra and other famous sights.  Weave your way through a maze of medieval lanes, exquisite architecture and lively bars as you arrive into the 16th-century old town. One of the most popular bars to visit Café Iruna was frequented by Ernest Hemingway, who spent many years in Pamplona and set his modernist novel ‘The Sun Also Rises’ in the city.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Leyre

A modern hotel in the centre of Pamplona. Only a few minutes from the main Estafeta Street. All rooms are ensuite, and although very modern in style, the building is a classic Pamplonan townhouse. Breakfast is an extensive affair with a variety of local meats and cheeses along with fruits, granola and fresh breads.

DAY 5
Walk to Puente de la Reina

Today you depart Pamplona and leave the Atlantic region of Navarra behind. The scenery will change before you as you pass through different and unique flora. Crossing the Alto Del Perdon (Hill of Forgiveness), you will see one of the most scenic and popular photo areas on the Camino Frances. Today’s destination is Puente de la Reina, home of the Church of Santiago, a must-see location. At the high point of Alto de Perdon , see the extensive sculpture of pilgrims and their animals stretching out across the pass. Enjoy panoramic views back to Pamplona and along the valley before continuing to follow the scallop shell markers as you continue on your journey to Santiago de Compostela.

Walk: 24km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation:  Hostal Bidean

A charming 17th-century Navarran house. Lovingly restored, the building has retained its wooden and stone construction. In the centre of the Puente de la Reina, the hotel has restored the basement winery and restaurant. Hostal Bidean has welcomed Camino pilgrims for many decades and provides  a comfortable night’s sleep.

DAY 6
Walk to Estella

The route today will take you to Estella through mostly rural terrain and a few small villages. The path is generally quiet and serene, allowing you to take in the scenery around you. After arriving in Estella, you will have the opportunity to buy delicious local food such as chorizo and cheese and explore locations such as the Church of Santo Sepulcro and the Convent of Santo Domingo. When leaving Puente de la Reina, the route follows the river and then climbs steeply across a landscape of cultivated fields, olive groves and farming communities who have worked the land for centuries. After passing through several small hamlets, the most significant is the climb to Cirauqui (Basque for vipers nest, due to the rocky outcrop it was built on). The 13th-century church is particularly impressive, complete with Gothic doors. Leaving Cirauqui is by way of an old Roman road as you continue the journey to Estella, your overnight stay tonight.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Yerri

In a central location in Estella, Hotel Yerri has a bar and restaurant serving a wide range of local and international dishes. The famous Santo Sepulcro Church is a 15-minute walk from the hotel and for all Camino walkers, the hotel staff are happy to help with any needs you may have.

DAY 7
Walk to Los Arcos

Your Camino journey today continues to the town of Los Arcos. Not long after leaving Estella, you will reach Bodegas Irache, a wine museum and free wine fountain provided to quench the thirst of Camino walkers. After leaving Estella, the walk to Los Arcos leads you over a landscape of vineyards and cereal crops, only interrupted by the sound of footsteps. A truly enjoyable afternoon of walking across one of the most peaceful stretches of the Camino.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Pension Mav

A classic pilgrim pension. Simple, comfortable and a great atmosphere created by the number of fellow walkers which choose to stay at this property. All rooms are ensuite.

DAY 8
Walk to Logroño

Today you will cross into the world-famous Rioja wine region and the renowned wine-producing town of Logroño. After leaving Los Arcos, within 8km you will reach the sleepy village of Torres del Rio where you can visit the Santo Sepulcro church. Octagonal in shape, it is believed to have been built by the Knights of the Templar and has many Byzantine and Arabic influences. As you get closer to Logrono, you will notice the beautiful vineyards of La Rioja, the wine country of Spain. Logrono is a popular and busy place for tourists and locals of Spain who come here to celebrate weddings, birthdays and other events. The party vibe is amazing, but the town also has some great historical sights such as the Cathedral, a number of churches and the architecture of San Juan Street with its famous pintxo bars.

Walk: 28km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Sercotel Portales

Nestled in the heart of the old town, this hotel is located on the Camino route and has combined style and comfort for one night in Logroño. The main Calle Laurel is only a minute’s walk away, where there is an abundance of tapas bars and plenty of opportunities to sample many of the locally produced Rioja wines.

DAY 9
Walk to Nájera

Despite the long distance, today is a relatively easy walk. Depart Logroño through the Puerta del Camino and head out through vineyards and crop fields. First is an easy walk to Navarette, a historically significant town built by the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre.  The old plaza is a great spot to rest the feet for lunch, and before leaving the town, visit the church of Ascension, built in the 1500s. The walk onward to Nájera is mostly downhill. Built on the banks of the river Najerilla, its Arabic name means between rocks and was the base for several of the Navarran Kings during medieval times.

Walk: 29km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Duques de Nareja

A delightful 17th-century property overlooking the nearby Najerilla River. Each room has its own ensuite with fresh, vibrant decor. From the hotel, stroll out into the old town and soak up the atmosphere of the historic old quarter.

DAY 10
Walk to Santo Domingo de la Calzada

The day begins by walking out onto country lanes and over rolling farmland to the village of Azofra, the site of a pilgrim’s hostel built in 1168. On the edge of the town, you will find a botanical garden dedicated to the patron saint of La Rioja. The Camino continues into the glorious medieval centre of Santo Domingo de la Calzada. The town was originally founded by a young shepherd who despite being denied entry into the San Millan de la Cogolla monastery, set up his own hermitage in the woods and was later ordained a priest for ridding Los Arcos from a plague of locusts. Today, the town has a variety of bars, shops and a luxury Parador hotel, formerly a pilgrim’s hospital.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hostal Molino de Florence

A 19th-century building converted farm property. Not far from the Camino route, the hostal is simple but rated highly by walkers that stay here. If you don’t want to venture far, you can dine at the hostal restaurant and relax in the bar afterwards before retiring to your ensuite room.

DAY 11
Walk to Belorado

You start the day with a scenic route through woods and fields with occasional bubbling brooks before approaching the majestic Oca Mountains. You travel towards the mountain range en route to Belorado, a relaxing town with some lovely sights. The altarpiece of San Juan Bautista, a 16th-century church, is a must-see. As you pass through the villages today, glimpses of the Oca Mountains will come into view, which during the middle ages were feared owing to a high number of bandits that hid in the nearby woodland. On arrival into Belorado, head to the Plaza Mayor and enjoy a cool cerveza from one of the many pavement café bars.

Walk: 24km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Jacoebo

Built in 1850, the hotel was acquired by the Uzquiza brothers. With a lively atmosphere, the hotel interior has preserved the original stone walls and wooden beams whilst the ensuite rooms have been renovated with modern furnishings.

DAY 12
Walk to San Juan de Ortega

Walking out of Belorado, you will pass the Santa Clara Convent, built on the site of a hermitage which the Moors destroyed. A varied trail of forest and countryside heads to the village of Villafranca Montes de Oca, which several hundred years ago had up to nine temples and shrines, and two hospitals. Climbing out of Villafranca, ascend to a panoramic vantage point at Alto de Valbuena and descend into San Juan de Ortega. Arriving in St Juan de Ortega, you will have the chance to visit the historical Gothic Mausoleum.

Walk: 24km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: La Henera (or something similar)

Next door to the sanctuary and monastery of San Juan de Ortega, La Henera has a privileged position in this serene rural location. This popular rustic property has ten ensuite rooms and an extensive garden, complete with original water well, where you can read and soak up the warmth of the evening sun.

DAY 13
Walk to Burgos

On this day 13 of the Camino, you will briefly travel further through the mountains before descending into the valley of the Pico River. This will be your final view of untouched nature for a little while as you then head closer to the built-up town of Burgos, where this leg of the journey ends.  It is a pleasant and easygoing day to reach your overnight stay of Burgos. En route, stop at the village of Atapuerca home to a series of UNESCO-listed pre-historic caves where evidence of the earliest apes in Western Europe have been discovered. Climbing out of Atapuerca, continue across open heathland and descend into the city of Burgos, where you will spend two nights.

Walk: 28km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Norte y Londres (or something similar)

In the heart of the historical quarter, the hotel is less than a couple of minutes walk from the grand cathedral, overlooking the pedestrian Plaza de Alonso Martinez. Hop between cafes and wine bars, sampling the best local specialities and enjoy being part of the lively theatre found in tapas bars.

DAY 14
Walk to Hornillos del Camino

You will head back into nature as you depart Burgos and pass through the crop fields that scatter the landscape of this region. You will then pass through the historical site where the largest forests of Europe once existed before arriving in Hontanas. Having passed through a number of small settlements the trail crosses grazing pastures and past the fountain, Fuente de Prao Torre, from where you will begin a steady climb. As the trail flattens, you are greeted with impressive views across the region of Meseta ahead of you. It’s then downhill into Hornillos del Camino.

Walk: 21km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Norte y Londres (or something similar

DAY 15
Walk to Castrojeriz

The first leg of this day’s trek will take you on an ascent to a plateau, followed by a further descent into the valley of the River Bol. Today you will get your fair share of beautiful scenery as you pass through crops and pastures, hills and valleys of the rivers Odrilla and Pisuerga. You will pass through the last plains of the region as you follow the river Pisuerga towards the province of Palenica and to the final destination of the day, Boadilla. Here you will be able to explore and visit the beautiful “La Asuncion”, a 14th-century gothic church.  Before arriving in Castrojeriz, you will see the 9th-century ruins of Castrojeriz up on the hillside. The village roots date back to Celtic times, and should you have the energy in your legs, some of the best views on today’s walk are from the 9th-century castle ruins high above Castrojeriz.

Walk: 21km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel la Cachava (or something similar)

Within a short distance on arriving into Castrojeriz, you will reach this welcoming, family run hotel. Enjoy the private courtyard where you can also dine, enjoy a drink or simply relax with your book. With the feel of a family stay, rather than a hotel, the friendly are always to help you with anything you may need during your stay.

DAY 16
Walk to Frómista

After leaving Castroojoriz, pass the Canal de Castilla, with its complex network of canals built between the 18th and 19th centuries. These canals were used as a transport route for Castilian cereal before the construction of a railway saw it become unused. Another place of note in this area is the church of San Martín, which was built all the way back in the 11th century.  With very little shade on hot, sunny days, the small hamlets you will pass through are a welcome relief for all Camino walkers. The rolling descent into Fromista leads you into a rich agricultural region. Although a small town, Fromista boasts two national monuments: the 11th-century Igelsia de San Martin de tours (built as part of a Benedictine Monastery) and the Iglesia Santa Maria del Castillo (famed for its altarpiece of 29 paintings).

Walk: 25.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: A rustic property with a sun terrace. Originally built as an inn for pilgrims, this property has been expanded to cater for modern-day Camino walkers. You are welcomed by the grandeur of 7 original Roman-style stone pillars. You choose between dining in the hotel restaurant or heading out to a local cafe in Fromista.

DAY 17
Walk to Carrión de los Condes

You will next pass through the town of Población de Campos before coming to Villalcázar de Sirga where you can view the fantastic Templar church of Santa María la Blanca, with its transitional architecture blending Roman and Gothic styles. The village is dominated by the Church of the White Virgin, built by the knights of the Templar, though what you will see is only a fraction of the original building as Napoleon’s troops significantly damaged it during the Napoleonic wars.

After leaving here, we head towards the final destination of the day, Carrión de los Condes. This historical town sits upon the banks of the Carrión River. In the past, great walls divided the town into different neighbourhoods. Today, you can still view the various churches and other great architectural buildings.

Walk: 20km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: La Corte (or something similar)

Walk straight off the route into La Corte. Located opposite the Church of Santa Maria del Camino, all rooms feature an ensuite bathroom, and the popular restaurant serves regional dishes such as lamb chops and seared vegetables.

DAY 18
Walk to Calzadilla de la Cueza

Although a long distance, the route is predominantly flat today. Depart Carrión and head over the 16th-century bridge as the route follows an old Roman road known as the Via Aquitania. For centuries this provided a vital pilgrimage and trading link between Burgos and Astorga. The path today is quite straightforward as you follow the river Uciesa through developed areas, which is a change from the rural scenery you would have seen a lot of so far. You will pass many rest areas before coming to Villalcazar de Sirga, a historical Campos village. From here you will head towards the final destination of the day, Ledigos, to rest and recover.

Walk: 16km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Room with ensuite

DAY 19
Walk to Sahagun

Just after leaving the village of Calzadilla de la Cueza, you will see the remains of what was a significant 11th-century hospital. Reaching Terradillos means you have completed almost half of the Camino France. The town of Terradillos de Los Templarios has a history of being a Knight’s Templar stronghold, but there are no remaining ruins or structures, unfortunately.  Walk through the town of San Nicolás de Real Camino and past the remains of the hermitage Ermita Virgen del Puente XIIth C. The two statues (Priest & Knights Templar) that stand guard at the entrance face each other and the gateway Centro Geográfico del Camino – the official halfway point.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Albergue los Templarios (or something similar)

Purpose built for Camino walkers and cyclists, this property is located within large grounds and has an extensive dining room, bar and laundry service (which is very useful at this stage of the walk!). With ample space outside to find your own corner to relax, you can also easily find many other Camino walkers to swap stories with at the bar.

DAY 20
Walk to El Burgo Ranero

Today you will once again pass through farmland. You will have a relaxed journey on this stretch as you pass over an ancient bridge and by other historic structures before reaching Bercianos del Real Camino. Bercianos del Real Camino, with a population of only 200, is where Iglesia de San Salvador is located. Today’s route crosses several valleys and over the Valderaduey River into the province of Leon. Breaking at Sahagun for lunch, As you continue, you will depart the expansive Tierra de Campos and head across a patchwork of fertile crop fields to El Burgo Ranero. Long before you arrive, you can see the large grain silos of Burgo in the distance.

Walk: 20km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation:  Albergue los Templarios (or something similar)

DAY 21
Walk to Mansilla de las Mulas

After walking through a number of small villages, the landscape begins to roll as you reach the old Roman settlement of Reliegos. In a bygone era, Reliegos was a significant transport centre being at the junction of three important trading roads. Leaving the village, the track becomes a little rocky as you make your way to Mansilla, which can be seen in the distance. On arrival, walk through the medieval gate of Castillo and into Plaza del Pozo, where you can find several delicious pastelerias serving flaky sweet pastries.

Walk: 19km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: La Pension Blanca (or something similar)

In the heart of medieval Mansilla, this simple pension has ensuite rooms. Breakfast is served in the adjacent building and for dinner, you can choose to dine in the neighbouring auberge or your host is happy to recommend a nearby restaurant in town.

DAY 22
Walk to León

On day 22 you will leave behind the scenic crops when once again you come across the signs of civilisation as you get closer to the city of Leon.  Crossing the Rio Elsa sets you on the trail for Leon.  After an hour, you will reach the village of Villamoros de Mansilla; the next village of Puente Villarente is just half an hour further. After Valdelafuente, you will pass through an industrial area, a clear sign that a bigger city is not far away. Puente Castro is right before Leon and it is undistinguishable where Puente Castro ends and where Leon begins. Once you arrive, you will be able to explore this ancient area which was the capital of the kingdom in the Middle Ages. Some interesting places to visit are the old Hospital de San Marcos and The Pulchra Leonina, often called the Sistine Chapel of Spanish architecture.  From the vantage point of Portillo Hill, you will enjoy excellent views across to Leon.

Walk: 19km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Fernando (or something similar)

Only a few minutes from the old city walls and glorious cathedral, the hotel occupies a Gothic building, typical of Leon’s architecture. In classic Camino pilgrim style, the rooms are simple and provide a good night’s rest after a long day on the track.

DAY 23
Walk to Mazarife

Your Camino journey begins by leaving Leon on foot. Having walked through the urban outskirts, you’ll head out onto trails with far-reaching views across to the Picos de Europa mountain tops. En route to Mazarife, you’ll head over the Passo Honroso Puente, a 200m long medieval bridge with 20 arch-shaped spans that pilgrims have been crossing since the 12th century. In early June each year, a colourful jousting festival takes place in honour of the knight, Don Suero, who challenged all knights that dared to cross the bridge as a display of his affections for his love.

Walk: 23km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Nuestra Señora de Lourdes (or something similar)

This hotel offers the feeling of a real home stay. Your host, Lola, has created a welcoming and peaceful garden to rest the legs after a day on the trail. Rooms are lovingly decorated with classic furniture and for breakfast, Lola makes a variety of fresh dishes using seasonal ingredients.

DAY 24
Walk to Astorga

Today, a fairly easy walk across farmland and villages as you cross the fertile plains of the Orbigo River. Head to the hamlets of Villares, Santibanez de Valdeiglesias and lastly, San Justo de la Vega before a short climb to your overnight stay in the town of Astorga. Founded in 14BC by the Romans, some of the original Roman walls can be seen at the edge of the town. You can also visit the impressive Episcopal Palace, designed by Gaudi, and if you have time, visit the chocolate museum, which recreates an old chocolate shop of the late 1800s.

Walk: 30km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Astur Plaza (or something similar)

Located close to the main square in the historic centre, you will only be 5 minutes walk from Gaudi Palace and the cathedral. Ensuite rooms are equipped with all comforts, and the dining room has typical stone walls and classic wooden furniture.

DAY 25
Walk to Rabanal del Camino

A gentle incline across farmland leads through the region of la Maragateria to the sleepy layover of Rabanal del Camino. Alternating between open plains and trails of heather and oak trees, the small patches of forest have offered shade for many a Camino hiker over the years on the ascent to Rabanal del Camino. Although a little stopover for today’s walkers, Rabanal was a significant town during the middle ages as it had many churches and a hospital founded and run by templar monks.

Walk: 21.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hostel el Refugio (or something similar)

Centrally located, this accommodation is well-known for its cosy and welcoming atmosphere. A typical stone building with wooden beam ceilings, the hotel’s restaurant is a popular choice for all walkers passing through the town.

DAY 26
Walk to Molinaseca/ Pomferrada

Leaving Rabanal, the route climbs towards the high point of Cruz Ferro (iron cross). At just 1500m, take a moment to enjoy the far-reaching views across the Camino. There are many theories as to the origins of the cross, but it is believed to have been erected in the 11th century. Traditionally, pilgrims will leave a small rock with a message on it for loved ones who they have bought from home. From the cross, the route descends into the delightful village of Molinaseca.

Walk: 26.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hostel Casa Rural el Palacio (or something similar)

Situated close to the river Hostel Casa Rural features a garden, bar and comfortable ensuite rooms. It’s only a few minutes walk to reach cafes, restaurants and the San Nicolas Church.

DAY 27
Walk to Villafranca del Bierzo

Within a couple of hours of leaving Molinaseca, you will reach Ponferrada, a former outpost of the Knights of the Templar. Do take time here to explore the magnificent castle which is said to have once housed the knights. With an abundance of cafes, it is a great opportunity to sample the traditional Camino almond cake and café con leche. Walking onwards to Villafranca, pass through the wine region of Bierzo and several small villages before arriving at Villafranca del Bierzo.

Walk: 31km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel La Puerta del Perdón (or something similar)

A friendly and rustic guesthouse, your hosts welcome you with iced lemon water and invite you to relax in their homes. Comfortable rooms and a breakfast with fresh fruits, homemade cakes and excellent coffee are the perfect set-up for another day on the Camino.

DAY 28
Walk to Herrarias/Bierzo O Cebreiro

Today, walk to the farming hamlet of Herrerias; the last stop is Castilla y Leon before crossing into Galicia. The familiar scallop shell markers guide you on your way across rolling farmland and deep into a lush valley as you follow the Valcarce River. On the approach to Herrerias, the route begins a sharp climb, which you will continue tomorrow. For this afternoon, though, head to your hotel and relax in this peaceful hillside town.

Walk: 23.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel El Capricho de Josana (or something similar)\

A simple hotel with great views across to the hills of Castilla y Leon, complete with garden and relaxing terrace area. The hotel is accustomed to welcoming Camino pilgrims and this is reflected in the great atmosphere they create in their onsite restaurant.

DAY 29
Walk to Triacastela

Today, continue the climb to the town of O Cebreiro. On arrival into O Cebreiro, take the opportunity to rest and explore the dry stone houses complete with thatched roofs. In the town you may even encounter musicians playing folk music with a galleta galleo (bagpipes), which stems from the Celtic connection in the middle ages. With the climbing complete for the day, you can enjoy a predominantly downhill trail to Triacastela.

Walk: 32km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Casa Pacios (or something similar)

A 17th-century rural house Casa Pacios is located just outside Triacastela. It is a wonderful contrast to spend a night in the relaxing countryside, in an ensuite room.

DAY 30
Walk to Sarria

Today you can choose from two routes. Follow a trail through a succession of villages to Samos, where you will have spectacular views of the Galician mountains over to the east. Here you can opt to take a more challenging trail to visit a remarkable Benedictine Monastery, a significant stop on the Way of St. James and a real highlight of the Camino Frances. Alternatively, you can take a rural route towards Sarria, which is a little shorter (and omits the visit to Samos). On arrival into Sarria, seek out the historic streets where you can visit the 13th-century O’Salvador Gothic church and the medieval fortress of Sarria.

Walk: 25km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Roma (or something similar)

Since 1930, Hotel Roma has been welcoming pilgrims into their hotel. Nestled away down a quiet street, the simple hotel has a traditional Galician restaurant and comfortable ensuite rooms.

DAY 31
Walk to Portomarin

Begin the day by walking through a woodland of ancient oak, birch and chestnut forests, before joining the official Camino trail. Marked by the famous scallop shell waymarks of this world-renowned route, stroll alongside fellow pilgrims as the trail undulates across grazing pastures and farm tracks, passing through tiny hamlets where you see many traditional barns. Descend into Portomarin via the Mino Reservoir, the former site of Portomarin town. In the 1960s Portomarin was moved brick by brick to higher ground, including the imposing structures of San Nicolas and San Pedro church.

Walk: 23km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Pousada de Portomarin (or something similar)

This modern hotel has been welcoming pilgrims for the last 50 years. A typical simple walkers hotel, rooms are comfortable, ensuite and bright. Other facilities include a bar, café, restaurant and a swimming pool open during the high summer months.

DAY 32
Walk to Palas de Rei

The day begins with a steady climb through pine forests, corn fields and across meadows. Today’s high point is Sierra Ligonde (720m). Here you can make a small detour to the 14th-century Romanesque church of El Salvador at Vilar de Donas, a national monument to the Knights of Santiago. The last gentle climb of the day passes through age-old villages and descends into the town of Palas de Rei (Palace of the Kings), where you will spend tonight.

Walk: 26km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Complejo la Cabana (or something similar)

Just off the main route, this lodge-style accommodation is surrounded by pine and chestnut trees. The property is split across 3 buildings, with all rooms having en-suite bathrooms. A public swimming pool is nearby if you want to cool your legs off. Afterwards, you can dine in the hotel restaurant, serving classic, regional dishes.

DAY 33
Walk to Arzua

A long but manageable day follows secluded trails through woodlands and into a region dotted with medieval castles, churches and ancient settlements. After leaving Palas de Rei you will soon reach the classic Camino village of San Xulian with its tiny 12th-century church. The trail continues to climb, crossing Porto de Boi and through the villages of Campanilla and Leboreiro, where you can visit a 13th-century Romanesque church. Before arriving in Arzua you pass the ancient town of Melide, famous for the classic Galician dish of pulpo a galega (octopus).

Walk: 29km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Casa Teodora (or something similar)

A family-run business, brothers Jesus and Gabriel manage this popular Camino stopover. The restaurant is popular with locals and serves fresh sardines and beef shank, complemented by local wines, such as a perfectly chilled Albarino and Ribeiros white wine.

DAY 34
Walk to Rua / Pedrouzo

The penultimate day of walking weaves its way towards Santiago across farmland and woodland. The trail heads through several villages, including Cortobe and Fondevila which have seemingly stood still in time since the middle ages. A gentle ascent leads up to the 18th-century hilltop chapel of Santa Irene (named after a Christian martyr). The last few km of today’s route follow a shaded trail through eucalyptus woods before arriving in the lively town of Rua.

Walk: 17km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel O’Pina (or something similar)

For over fifty years Hotel O’Pina has been welcoming pilgrims on the last leg of their journey to Santiago. Small and hospitable, the ensuite rooms are spacious and the hotel restaurant is famous for its fresh, daily serving of empanada Gallega (Galician pie).

DAY 35
Walk to Santiago de Compostela

Today, the Camino leads you into the heart of Santiago de Compostela to the majestic cathedral in Plaza de Obradoiro. Leaving Rua, rural trails give way to an urban environment as fellow walkers begin to converge for the last leg of this historic route. As you pass through Lavacolla, before crossing the stream, tradition would usually see pilgrims bathe and purify themselves in preparation for their arrival to Santiago. The final stretch to Santiago heads into the magnificent historic centre where you can present your pilgrim passport and receive your ‘Compostela’ certificate. With 2 nights in Santiago, you can relax and recharge your legs this afternoon before exploring this UNESCO listed city tomorrow.

Walk: 23km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Avenida (or something similar)

Only a 5-minute walk from the cathedral, this rustic hotel is located next to Alameda Park. A traditional building with a modern interior, Hotel Avenida offers a comfortable stay and being so close to the historic centre means you can easily spend the following day resting at your hotel and heading out to explore the buzz of Santiago.

DAY 36
Onward Travel

Depending on your onward travel plans, you can spend the morning soaking up the atmosphere of the plaza before heading off on your journey home.

Meals: Breakfast

WHAT’S INCLUDED

  • Pack-free walking

  • 25+ years experience

  • Customised

  • Eco Travel

  • 35 nights of accommodation & 35 breakfasts
  • Add a rest day/s if you wish
  • Luggage transfers as described
  • Rest days in Burgos, Leon and Santiago
  • Receiving your Compostela certificate for completing the full route – Pilgrim Passport
  • Route Notes, Maps and GPX tracks
  • Walk the full Camino Frances route (812km) from St Jean to Santiago de Compostela
  • Solo walking is possible at an extra cost – see General Info

ACCOMMODATION & DINING

OVERVIEW

During this tour, you will stay in simple, small family-run hotels and guest houses that have been welcoming walkers of the Camino for many years. All rooms are ensuite and, typically, in the style of the Camino; accommodations have a great atmosphere as the majority of other guests will be fellow walkers. As this walk is a very busy route, similar accommodations can be used other than that listed. Please note that booking 35 accommodations in sequence might result in the walking days being shortened or lengthened on the odd occasion to make all the accommodations line up. The accommodation shown is only an indication of the class that will be booked and we will do our best to match the standard if we cannot get what is displayed.

Single Rooms
If you are travelling with family and/or friends but would like single rooms, we would advise booking as soon as your plans are finalised to secure your rooming preferences. Single rooms incur an additional single occupancy fee.

Dining
You will be provided with 35 breakfasts. If you have any food allergies or intolerances, please let us know at the time of booking so we can let your hosts know. Should you have severe food allergies, it’s always worth bringing a few of your own snacks with you.

Many of the accommodations have their own restaurant, which serves regional dishes using local ingredients. Although dinners aren’t included in this tour, dinners can be included each evening as a supplement if you wish. Lunches can be purchased locally. This is a great part of the experience. You can either order lunch from your accommodation or buy local cheeses and meats along with a wide variety of different breads you will find along the Camino.

 

GENERAL INFO

AVAILABILITY

This tour is available from the start of April through October. Regardless of when you travel there are often celebrations along the Camino, specific to the individual towns or regions. From the jousting festival at Passo Honroso Puente through to the Rioja Wine festival in Logroño and the nationwide celebrations of Semana Santa, walking the Camino is a colourful experience.

On some occasions, but not often, the walk days may vary slightly regarding their length to what we have advertised. This will be to allow us to book the 35 accommodations in sequence to facilitate this walk.

Solo walking is allowed, but as there are many transfers that are costed as being shared across 2 walkers, this will come at an extra cost. Please speak to the office about the price of this.

WEATHER

The route runs across northern Spain and through a variety of terrain. During the early and latter part of the season, conditions can be changeable from temperate warm days through to frosty mornings and very cool nights. From May to September, rainy days are less frequent, and temperatures are steadily between 20-24 degrees. However, it is possible that you may experience a few cloudy days.

THE WALKING

We grade this walk as Challenging only because of the back-to-back walking days over 812km. We may have to shorten or even lengthen the walking day to make the accommodation bookings work. Of course, we will let you know if this happens. The Camino is a well-trodden route, so the trails are very well-defined for the most part. You will follow an ancient pilgrim trail;  whilst sections of the walk will take you deep into the picturesque countryside, you will also walk through urban environments and along roads as you follow the truest route possible.

You should be used to walking up to 30km with up to 500m of ascent and descent. On any typical day, you will hike on rocky trails, farm and forest tracks and cover long sections in the open countryside. You will sustain climbs to hilltop towns, villages, and the rolling countryside. You will also walk on some roads, so please be mindful of all road users at all times.

A moderate active lifestyle makes walking enjoyable; an exercise regime of 3 to 4 times a week is needed, in addition to your usual walks. We would also advise that you regularly walk back-to-back days to prepare for the duration of this tour which is 36 days.

The route is very well waymarked by the iconic scallop-shell markers, and with the many other walkers on the trail, it’s straightforward to find your way. For each walk, you will be provided daily walk notes, a map and the GPX tracks if you wish to use them for your own device.

HOW TO GET THERE AND AWAY

The tour starts in Saint Jean Pied de Port and finishes in Santiago de Compostela. The best way to reach Saint Jean is by arriving at one of the following airports: Madrid or Biarritz (Bayonne Train Station).

From Madrid, a 3 to 4-hour train journey connects (from the airport as well) to Pamplona.  Then a 2 hr bus ride on to St Jean.

From Biarritz (Bayonne) it is an hour by train to St Jean.

Getting away from Santiago de Compostela by train or air is very easy.  Flights go from Santiago to all over Europe.

INSURANCE

We require that you have adequate travel insurance against potential losses, damage or injury, including cancellation costs and loss of luggage.

For all trips that require international travel, you must have purchased travel insurance that also includes medical evacuation coverage.

We also charge a cancellation fee if you cancel your walking holiday after we have confirmed it to cover costs incurred from our suppliers and in the office.  See the FAQ section for more information.

MAP

DEPARTURE DATES

  • DATES
    AVAILABILITY
    PRICE
    PER PERSON
    Single Occupancy
    DETAILS
  • 1 Mar 2024 - 31 Oct 2024
    AVAILABLE
    from

    $5965

    SINGLE OCCUPANCY
    $1935

    $800 deposit per pax

  • 1 Mar 2025 - 31 Oct 2025
    AVAILABLE
    from

    $6205

    SINGLE OCCUPANCY
    $2010

    $800 deposit per pax

FAQS

Q: What happens if I don’t want to walk one of the days, can I travel with the luggage?

Unfortunately, walkers cannot travel with the luggage. The information you are provided with has details for local taxi numbers, bus and train timetables should you wish to not walk on any day. Your accommodation hosts will also have up to date information and advice should you wish to travel to the next destination by local transport. As always, you can call us in the office should you need help during your walk.

Q: Where would you suggest adding an extra night?

Leon, a vibrant city, which has been welcoming Camino walkers for centuries! The two major sights of Leon is the Casa de Botines, designed by Antoni Guadi and Hostal San Marcos (a former monastery and shelter for pilgrims during the middle ages. This exquisite property is now a luxury parador hotel). If you wish to start your Camino in style, we can arrange an upgrade for you to this luxury hotel. Traicastela if you really want to do nothing and relax by the pool, this is the perfect hotel to do so. Once walkers have departed for the day, there really is little more to do other than to take up residence by the pool and recharge in the peace of the countryside. Santiago, of course! This city is worthy of an extra day and not just to further explore the grand cathedral. Santiago boasts a wealth of medieval architecture, tapas bars and restaurants. We can also arrange an onward walk to the coastal point of Finisterre. Regarded as the end of the world by the Romans, many pilgrims continue on walking for several days to reach Finisterre. Having completed the Camino, it is an extra 4 days to reach Finisterre with a transfer back to Santiago on the fifth day. Burgo and Legrono are also great plalces to add a rest day

Q: Can you extend our stay in Santiago de Compostela?

Of course, please let us know at the time of booking if you would like to extend your time in Santiago.

Q: Can my children walk with me?

We don't allow children under the age of 16 to do this walk.

Q: Is this tour OK for solo walkers?

Absolutely. Many people choose to complete stages of the Camino as a solo walker. There are many people walking the route and many of the overnight stays welcome hordes of walkers which means you can choose to walk your own journey or join in the camaraderie of walking with others.

Q: We’re travelling as friends but would like single rooms?

Subject to a single occupancy payment, single rooms are available. However, due to the limited accommodation single rooms might not always be available for every night of the tour, but we will let you know your options throughout the booking process.

Q: Can we reduce the days walked?

We wouldn’t suggest completing the itinerary in less than 38 days but 39 days with an extra night along the way is always a good idea. Speak to the office to insert another rest day if you want to when booking.

Q: Can we extend the days walked?

Of course, we’re happy to discuss your needs.

SIMILAR TRIPS

Camino Frances: The Full Route – 38 Days

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Complete the epic, historic Camino Frances in 38 days, walking from the French town of Saint Jean Pied de Port to Spain’s Santiago de Compostela.

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What's Included
  • 37 nights of accommodation & 37 breakfasts
  • Luggage transfers as described
  • Rest days in Leon and Santiago
  • Receiving your Compostela certificate for completing the full route – Pilgrim Passport
  • Route Notes, Maps and GPX tracks
  • Walk the full Camino Frances route (812km) from St Jean to Santiago de Compostela
  • Solo walking is possible at an extra cost – see General Info
  • An $800 deposit per pax is needed to book this trip

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What's Included
  • 16 nights accommodation
  • 16 breakfasts
  • Luggage transfers as described
  • Pilgrim Passport
  • Flexible itinerary to add days
  • Receiving your Compostela certificate for completing 300km of the Camino
  • Route Notes, Maps and GPX tracks
  • 24/7 telephone support
  • Walk the world-famous Camino from Leon to Santiago de Compostela
  • Explore the architecture of Gaudi in Leon and Astorga
  • Follow old Roman roads into medieval towns and hilltop villages

Portuguese Camino de Santiago – 14 Days

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Portuguese Camino de Santiago – 14 Days

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What's Included
  • Walk the Portuguese Camino de Santiago (way of St James)from Porto all the way to Santiago de Compostela
  • 13 night’s accommodation in 2 to 3 star character filled hotels (an upgrade to 4 star and better accommodation is available.)
  • Breakfast on every day of the walk
  • On the ground support from local representatives
  • Our comprehensive set of notes, detailed walking itineraries, integrated maps and insider tips (where to get the best tapas plus a lot more)
  • Total walking distance of 230km, a real challenge
  • All transport on and off the track including luggage transfers
  • Take advantage of nearly 30 years experience in organising self-guided walking holidays

Portuguese Coastal Camino Way of St James – 15 Days

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Portuguese Coastal Camino Way of St James – 15 Days

BACK
What's Included
  • Walk the Portuguese Coastal Camino de Santiago (Way of St James) from Porto all the way to Santiago de Compostela via the coast
  • 14 night’s accommodation in 2 to 3-star (or 4- star or better on the luxury trip) character-filled hotels and breakfast on every day of the walk.
    An upgrade to 4-star and better accommodation is available.
  • Our comprehensive set of notes, detailed walking itineraries, integrated maps and insider tips (where to get the best tapas plus a lot more)
  • Pilgrim kit: passport (credentials) and shell (Viera) and walk 259kms on the Portuguese Camino the Way of St James pack free
  • All luggage transfers and transport on the track
  • Take advantage of nearly 30 years experience in organising self-guided walking holidays
  • On the ground support from local representatives
  • You can shorten the walk if you wish and start from closer to Santiago de Compostela
Overview

OVERVIEW

Challenge yourself to completing the historic, UNESCO-protected Camino Frances, walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela, in 36 days. This is the same walk as the 38 day trip but without rest days.

Since the discovery of Saint James' tomb in the 9th century, pilgrims have walked the 812km route to reach Santiago's spectacular cathedral in Plaza de Obradoiro.  Follow in the footsteps of intrepid pilgrims as you embark on a journey traversing the French Pyrenees and across the rich cultural landscape of northern Spain.

Over 36 days, follow the iconic scallop shell markers through a patchwork of rolling countryside. Explore the medieval historic centres of Leon, Astorga and Pamplona. Hop between tapas bars as you sample the local delicacies. Whether you are walking the Camino for your own spiritual journey or simply for the physical and cultural experience, this world-famous route is one of the most unique long-distance treks in the world.

Highlights

  • Walk the full 812km of the Camino Frances route
  • Hike across the stunning French Pyrenees into Basque country
  • Visit the charming 16th-century town of Pamplona
  • Discover ancient villages and medieval churches
  • Wonder at the architecture of Antoni Gaudi in Leon and Astorga
  • End your journey in Santiago's spectacular Plaza de Obradoiro

WALK OVERVIEW

TYPE OF WALK
SELF GUIDED
TRIP LENGTH
36 DAYS
WALK GRADE
Challenging

Grade 5 - Challenging

Longer, tougher, steeper hill sections, rough surfaces and many steps. Active lifestyle, good fitness and walking experience required.

PRICE FROM
$ 5965

per person twin/double share

SINGLE OCCUPANCY
$ 1935

Accommodations charge the same price per room regardless of whether there are one or two people occupying it. To cover the cost of the accommodation when occupied by one person we need to charge the single occupancy fee.

per person

Book now
Itinerary

ITINERARY

  • Day 1
  • Day 2
  • Day 3
  • Day 4
  • Day 5
  • Day 6
  • Day 7
  • Day 8
  • Day 9
  • Day 10
  • Day 11
  • Day 12
  • Day 13
  • Day 14
  • Day 15
  • Day 16
  • Day 17
  • Day 18
  • Day 19
  • Day 20
  • Day 21
  • Day 22
  • Day 23
  • Day 24
  • Day 25
  • Day 26
  • Day 27
  • Day 28
  • Day 29
  • Day 30
  • Day 31
  • Day 32
  • Day 33
  • Day 34
  • Day 35
  • Day 36

DAY 1
Arrive Saint Jean Pied de Port

On this first day, you can view the sights after being booked in a hotel in the centre of town.

This beautiful walled city is the modern-day starting point for the full Camino Frances route. Nestled in the French Pyrenees, the Spanish border is a mere 8km away. Visit the old prison and the popular Gate of St James as you explore the area. Before leaving, take the time to explore the old medieval walls where you can see the original city gates at either end of the Rue de la Citadelle, the town’s main cobbled street. Later, collect your pilgrim’s passport before your first day of walking tomorrow.

Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Itzalpea

A family home built in 1807, this hotel is located in the heart of French Basque country. The house has a tearoom, where you can order local pastries and cafe au lait. Rooms are comfortable with classic ensuite furnishings.

DAY 2
Walk to Roncesvalles

Begin your Camino walk, following in the footsteps of thousands before you. Departing Saint Jean on foot, head over the old bridge and under the statue of St James, patron saint of Spain. Here, a challenging trail begins to climb to the Roncesvalles Pass (1450m), as you follow the old Napoleonic military route. Guided by the scallop shell waymarkers, cross the border into Spanish Basque country, which is truly unique. Unlike the rest of Spain, the region has its own culinary traditions and a very unique language.

Walk: 25km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Roncevalles

Contemporary rooms are housed in a central medieval building. The dining room still has the original wooden beams, and there is a sun terrace where you can pull up a chair and enjoy a drink before heading to your ensuite room.

DAY 3
Walk to Larrasoaña

With your feet now firmly accustomed to the rhythm of the Camino, head out along a trail lined with oak and beech trees before arriving at the village of Espinal. Today the Camino takes you first to Espinal across amazing mountains, woods and meadows. The view in Espinal is worth seeing with its majestic backdrop of the Pyrenees. You will then pass through the scenic Burgette before making your way to Zubiri, with its Medieval Bridge and serene atmosphere. This sleepy village is a great spot to pick up some provisions before heading over the Alto de Mezquiriz mountain pass. Followed by a steep descent, you will arrive at the village of Zubiri and its medieval Puente de la Rabia (Rabies Bridge). In olden times, the bridge is said to have cured animals of disease if they crossed it three times. Leaving Espinal the route presents another pass to cross, the Alto de Erro. This long but challenging day ends at Larrasoaña or Zubiri.

Walk: 28km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation:  Casa Elita

A family-run bed and breakfast, your host Elita will welcome you after a long day of walking. You can relax in the shared lounge or your ensuite room. Elita is well known for providing great breakfasts with fresh, warm pastries and plentiful supplies of tea and coffee.

DAY 4
Walk to Pamplona

A shorter day today as you head to the lively town of Pamplona, famed for its Running of the Bulls festival. The River Arga guides the way on Day 4 as you follow it past hills covered in a variety of different trees. As you get closer to Pamplona, the rural landscape slowly disappears, passing some smaller towns along the way. Pamplona is a sight to behold and one of the jewels of the Camino Frances. Check out the cathedral, the Citadel of Pamplona, the Museum of Navarra and other famous sights.  Weave your way through a maze of medieval lanes, exquisite architecture and lively bars as you arrive into the 16th-century old town. One of the most popular bars to visit Café Iruna was frequented by Ernest Hemingway, who spent many years in Pamplona and set his modernist novel ‘The Sun Also Rises’ in the city.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Leyre

A modern hotel in the centre of Pamplona. Only a few minutes from the main Estafeta Street. All rooms are ensuite, and although very modern in style, the building is a classic Pamplonan townhouse. Breakfast is an extensive affair with a variety of local meats and cheeses along with fruits, granola and fresh breads.

DAY 5
Walk to Puente de la Reina

Today you depart Pamplona and leave the Atlantic region of Navarra behind. The scenery will change before you as you pass through different and unique flora. Crossing the Alto Del Perdon (Hill of Forgiveness), you will see one of the most scenic and popular photo areas on the Camino Frances. Today’s destination is Puente de la Reina, home of the Church of Santiago, a must-see location. At the high point of Alto de Perdon , see the extensive sculpture of pilgrims and their animals stretching out across the pass. Enjoy panoramic views back to Pamplona and along the valley before continuing to follow the scallop shell markers as you continue on your journey to Santiago de Compostela.

Walk: 24km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation:  Hostal Bidean

A charming 17th-century Navarran house. Lovingly restored, the building has retained its wooden and stone construction. In the centre of the Puente de la Reina, the hotel has restored the basement winery and restaurant. Hostal Bidean has welcomed Camino pilgrims for many decades and provides  a comfortable night’s sleep.

DAY 6
Walk to Estella

The route today will take you to Estella through mostly rural terrain and a few small villages. The path is generally quiet and serene, allowing you to take in the scenery around you. After arriving in Estella, you will have the opportunity to buy delicious local food such as chorizo and cheese and explore locations such as the Church of Santo Sepulcro and the Convent of Santo Domingo. When leaving Puente de la Reina, the route follows the river and then climbs steeply across a landscape of cultivated fields, olive groves and farming communities who have worked the land for centuries. After passing through several small hamlets, the most significant is the climb to Cirauqui (Basque for vipers nest, due to the rocky outcrop it was built on). The 13th-century church is particularly impressive, complete with Gothic doors. Leaving Cirauqui is by way of an old Roman road as you continue the journey to Estella, your overnight stay tonight.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Yerri

In a central location in Estella, Hotel Yerri has a bar and restaurant serving a wide range of local and international dishes. The famous Santo Sepulcro Church is a 15-minute walk from the hotel and for all Camino walkers, the hotel staff are happy to help with any needs you may have.

DAY 7
Walk to Los Arcos

Your Camino journey today continues to the town of Los Arcos. Not long after leaving Estella, you will reach Bodegas Irache, a wine museum and free wine fountain provided to quench the thirst of Camino walkers. After leaving Estella, the walk to Los Arcos leads you over a landscape of vineyards and cereal crops, only interrupted by the sound of footsteps. A truly enjoyable afternoon of walking across one of the most peaceful stretches of the Camino.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Pension Mav

A classic pilgrim pension. Simple, comfortable and a great atmosphere created by the number of fellow walkers which choose to stay at this property. All rooms are ensuite.

DAY 8
Walk to Logroño

Today you will cross into the world-famous Rioja wine region and the renowned wine-producing town of Logroño. After leaving Los Arcos, within 8km you will reach the sleepy village of Torres del Rio where you can visit the Santo Sepulcro church. Octagonal in shape, it is believed to have been built by the Knights of the Templar and has many Byzantine and Arabic influences. As you get closer to Logrono, you will notice the beautiful vineyards of La Rioja, the wine country of Spain. Logrono is a popular and busy place for tourists and locals of Spain who come here to celebrate weddings, birthdays and other events. The party vibe is amazing, but the town also has some great historical sights such as the Cathedral, a number of churches and the architecture of San Juan Street with its famous pintxo bars.

Walk: 28km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Sercotel Portales

Nestled in the heart of the old town, this hotel is located on the Camino route and has combined style and comfort for one night in Logroño. The main Calle Laurel is only a minute’s walk away, where there is an abundance of tapas bars and plenty of opportunities to sample many of the locally produced Rioja wines.

DAY 9
Walk to Nájera

Despite the long distance, today is a relatively easy walk. Depart Logroño through the Puerta del Camino and head out through vineyards and crop fields. First is an easy walk to Navarette, a historically significant town built by the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre.  The old plaza is a great spot to rest the feet for lunch, and before leaving the town, visit the church of Ascension, built in the 1500s. The walk onward to Nájera is mostly downhill. Built on the banks of the river Najerilla, its Arabic name means between rocks and was the base for several of the Navarran Kings during medieval times.

Walk: 29km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Duques de Nareja

A delightful 17th-century property overlooking the nearby Najerilla River. Each room has its own ensuite with fresh, vibrant decor. From the hotel, stroll out into the old town and soak up the atmosphere of the historic old quarter.

DAY 10
Walk to Santo Domingo de la Calzada

The day begins by walking out onto country lanes and over rolling farmland to the village of Azofra, the site of a pilgrim’s hostel built in 1168. On the edge of the town, you will find a botanical garden dedicated to the patron saint of La Rioja. The Camino continues into the glorious medieval centre of Santo Domingo de la Calzada. The town was originally founded by a young shepherd who despite being denied entry into the San Millan de la Cogolla monastery, set up his own hermitage in the woods and was later ordained a priest for ridding Los Arcos from a plague of locusts. Today, the town has a variety of bars, shops and a luxury Parador hotel, formerly a pilgrim’s hospital.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hostal Molino de Florence

A 19th-century building converted farm property. Not far from the Camino route, the hostal is simple but rated highly by walkers that stay here. If you don’t want to venture far, you can dine at the hostal restaurant and relax in the bar afterwards before retiring to your ensuite room.

DAY 11
Walk to Belorado

You start the day with a scenic route through woods and fields with occasional bubbling brooks before approaching the majestic Oca Mountains. You travel towards the mountain range en route to Belorado, a relaxing town with some lovely sights. The altarpiece of San Juan Bautista, a 16th-century church, is a must-see. As you pass through the villages today, glimpses of the Oca Mountains will come into view, which during the middle ages were feared owing to a high number of bandits that hid in the nearby woodland. On arrival into Belorado, head to the Plaza Mayor and enjoy a cool cerveza from one of the many pavement café bars.

Walk: 24km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Jacoebo

Built in 1850, the hotel was acquired by the Uzquiza brothers. With a lively atmosphere, the hotel interior has preserved the original stone walls and wooden beams whilst the ensuite rooms have been renovated with modern furnishings.

DAY 12
Walk to San Juan de Ortega

Walking out of Belorado, you will pass the Santa Clara Convent, built on the site of a hermitage which the Moors destroyed. A varied trail of forest and countryside heads to the village of Villafranca Montes de Oca, which several hundred years ago had up to nine temples and shrines, and two hospitals. Climbing out of Villafranca, ascend to a panoramic vantage point at Alto de Valbuena and descend into San Juan de Ortega. Arriving in St Juan de Ortega, you will have the chance to visit the historical Gothic Mausoleum.

Walk: 24km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: La Henera (or something similar)

Next door to the sanctuary and monastery of San Juan de Ortega, La Henera has a privileged position in this serene rural location. This popular rustic property has ten ensuite rooms and an extensive garden, complete with original water well, where you can read and soak up the warmth of the evening sun.

DAY 13
Walk to Burgos

On this day 13 of the Camino, you will briefly travel further through the mountains before descending into the valley of the Pico River. This will be your final view of untouched nature for a little while as you then head closer to the built-up town of Burgos, where this leg of the journey ends.  It is a pleasant and easygoing day to reach your overnight stay of Burgos. En route, stop at the village of Atapuerca home to a series of UNESCO-listed pre-historic caves where evidence of the earliest apes in Western Europe have been discovered. Climbing out of Atapuerca, continue across open heathland and descend into the city of Burgos, where you will spend two nights.

Walk: 28km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Norte y Londres (or something similar)

In the heart of the historical quarter, the hotel is less than a couple of minutes walk from the grand cathedral, overlooking the pedestrian Plaza de Alonso Martinez. Hop between cafes and wine bars, sampling the best local specialities and enjoy being part of the lively theatre found in tapas bars.

DAY 14
Walk to Hornillos del Camino

You will head back into nature as you depart Burgos and pass through the crop fields that scatter the landscape of this region. You will then pass through the historical site where the largest forests of Europe once existed before arriving in Hontanas. Having passed through a number of small settlements the trail crosses grazing pastures and past the fountain, Fuente de Prao Torre, from where you will begin a steady climb. As the trail flattens, you are greeted with impressive views across the region of Meseta ahead of you. It’s then downhill into Hornillos del Camino.

Walk: 21km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Norte y Londres (or something similar

DAY 15
Walk to Castrojeriz

The first leg of this day’s trek will take you on an ascent to a plateau, followed by a further descent into the valley of the River Bol. Today you will get your fair share of beautiful scenery as you pass through crops and pastures, hills and valleys of the rivers Odrilla and Pisuerga. You will pass through the last plains of the region as you follow the river Pisuerga towards the province of Palenica and to the final destination of the day, Boadilla. Here you will be able to explore and visit the beautiful “La Asuncion”, a 14th-century gothic church.  Before arriving in Castrojeriz, you will see the 9th-century ruins of Castrojeriz up on the hillside. The village roots date back to Celtic times, and should you have the energy in your legs, some of the best views on today’s walk are from the 9th-century castle ruins high above Castrojeriz.

Walk: 21km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel la Cachava (or something similar)

Within a short distance on arriving into Castrojeriz, you will reach this welcoming, family run hotel. Enjoy the private courtyard where you can also dine, enjoy a drink or simply relax with your book. With the feel of a family stay, rather than a hotel, the friendly are always to help you with anything you may need during your stay.

DAY 16
Walk to Frómista

After leaving Castroojoriz, pass the Canal de Castilla, with its complex network of canals built between the 18th and 19th centuries. These canals were used as a transport route for Castilian cereal before the construction of a railway saw it become unused. Another place of note in this area is the church of San Martín, which was built all the way back in the 11th century.  With very little shade on hot, sunny days, the small hamlets you will pass through are a welcome relief for all Camino walkers. The rolling descent into Fromista leads you into a rich agricultural region. Although a small town, Fromista boasts two national monuments: the 11th-century Igelsia de San Martin de tours (built as part of a Benedictine Monastery) and the Iglesia Santa Maria del Castillo (famed for its altarpiece of 29 paintings).

Walk: 25.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: A rustic property with a sun terrace. Originally built as an inn for pilgrims, this property has been expanded to cater for modern-day Camino walkers. You are welcomed by the grandeur of 7 original Roman-style stone pillars. You choose between dining in the hotel restaurant or heading out to a local cafe in Fromista.

DAY 17
Walk to Carrión de los Condes

You will next pass through the town of Población de Campos before coming to Villalcázar de Sirga where you can view the fantastic Templar church of Santa María la Blanca, with its transitional architecture blending Roman and Gothic styles. The village is dominated by the Church of the White Virgin, built by the knights of the Templar, though what you will see is only a fraction of the original building as Napoleon’s troops significantly damaged it during the Napoleonic wars.

After leaving here, we head towards the final destination of the day, Carrión de los Condes. This historical town sits upon the banks of the Carrión River. In the past, great walls divided the town into different neighbourhoods. Today, you can still view the various churches and other great architectural buildings.

Walk: 20km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: La Corte (or something similar)

Walk straight off the route into La Corte. Located opposite the Church of Santa Maria del Camino, all rooms feature an ensuite bathroom, and the popular restaurant serves regional dishes such as lamb chops and seared vegetables.

DAY 18
Walk to Calzadilla de la Cueza

Although a long distance, the route is predominantly flat today. Depart Carrión and head over the 16th-century bridge as the route follows an old Roman road known as the Via Aquitania. For centuries this provided a vital pilgrimage and trading link between Burgos and Astorga. The path today is quite straightforward as you follow the river Uciesa through developed areas, which is a change from the rural scenery you would have seen a lot of so far. You will pass many rest areas before coming to Villalcazar de Sirga, a historical Campos village. From here you will head towards the final destination of the day, Ledigos, to rest and recover.

Walk: 16km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Room with ensuite

DAY 19
Walk to Sahagun

Just after leaving the village of Calzadilla de la Cueza, you will see the remains of what was a significant 11th-century hospital. Reaching Terradillos means you have completed almost half of the Camino France. The town of Terradillos de Los Templarios has a history of being a Knight’s Templar stronghold, but there are no remaining ruins or structures, unfortunately.  Walk through the town of San Nicolás de Real Camino and past the remains of the hermitage Ermita Virgen del Puente XIIth C. The two statues (Priest & Knights Templar) that stand guard at the entrance face each other and the gateway Centro Geográfico del Camino – the official halfway point.

Walk: 22km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Albergue los Templarios (or something similar)

Purpose built for Camino walkers and cyclists, this property is located within large grounds and has an extensive dining room, bar and laundry service (which is very useful at this stage of the walk!). With ample space outside to find your own corner to relax, you can also easily find many other Camino walkers to swap stories with at the bar.

DAY 20
Walk to El Burgo Ranero

Today you will once again pass through farmland. You will have a relaxed journey on this stretch as you pass over an ancient bridge and by other historic structures before reaching Bercianos del Real Camino. Bercianos del Real Camino, with a population of only 200, is where Iglesia de San Salvador is located. Today’s route crosses several valleys and over the Valderaduey River into the province of Leon. Breaking at Sahagun for lunch, As you continue, you will depart the expansive Tierra de Campos and head across a patchwork of fertile crop fields to El Burgo Ranero. Long before you arrive, you can see the large grain silos of Burgo in the distance.

Walk: 20km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation:  Albergue los Templarios (or something similar)

DAY 21
Walk to Mansilla de las Mulas

After walking through a number of small villages, the landscape begins to roll as you reach the old Roman settlement of Reliegos. In a bygone era, Reliegos was a significant transport centre being at the junction of three important trading roads. Leaving the village, the track becomes a little rocky as you make your way to Mansilla, which can be seen in the distance. On arrival, walk through the medieval gate of Castillo and into Plaza del Pozo, where you can find several delicious pastelerias serving flaky sweet pastries.

Walk: 19km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: La Pension Blanca (or something similar)

In the heart of medieval Mansilla, this simple pension has ensuite rooms. Breakfast is served in the adjacent building and for dinner, you can choose to dine in the neighbouring auberge or your host is happy to recommend a nearby restaurant in town.

DAY 22
Walk to León

On day 22 you will leave behind the scenic crops when once again you come across the signs of civilisation as you get closer to the city of Leon.  Crossing the Rio Elsa sets you on the trail for Leon.  After an hour, you will reach the village of Villamoros de Mansilla; the next village of Puente Villarente is just half an hour further. After Valdelafuente, you will pass through an industrial area, a clear sign that a bigger city is not far away. Puente Castro is right before Leon and it is undistinguishable where Puente Castro ends and where Leon begins. Once you arrive, you will be able to explore this ancient area which was the capital of the kingdom in the Middle Ages. Some interesting places to visit are the old Hospital de San Marcos and The Pulchra Leonina, often called the Sistine Chapel of Spanish architecture.  From the vantage point of Portillo Hill, you will enjoy excellent views across to Leon.

Walk: 19km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Fernando (or something similar)

Only a few minutes from the old city walls and glorious cathedral, the hotel occupies a Gothic building, typical of Leon’s architecture. In classic Camino pilgrim style, the rooms are simple and provide a good night’s rest after a long day on the track.

DAY 23
Walk to Mazarife

Your Camino journey begins by leaving Leon on foot. Having walked through the urban outskirts, you’ll head out onto trails with far-reaching views across to the Picos de Europa mountain tops. En route to Mazarife, you’ll head over the Passo Honroso Puente, a 200m long medieval bridge with 20 arch-shaped spans that pilgrims have been crossing since the 12th century. In early June each year, a colourful jousting festival takes place in honour of the knight, Don Suero, who challenged all knights that dared to cross the bridge as a display of his affections for his love.

Walk: 23km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Nuestra Señora de Lourdes (or something similar)

This hotel offers the feeling of a real home stay. Your host, Lola, has created a welcoming and peaceful garden to rest the legs after a day on the trail. Rooms are lovingly decorated with classic furniture and for breakfast, Lola makes a variety of fresh dishes using seasonal ingredients.

DAY 24
Walk to Astorga

Today, a fairly easy walk across farmland and villages as you cross the fertile plains of the Orbigo River. Head to the hamlets of Villares, Santibanez de Valdeiglesias and lastly, San Justo de la Vega before a short climb to your overnight stay in the town of Astorga. Founded in 14BC by the Romans, some of the original Roman walls can be seen at the edge of the town. You can also visit the impressive Episcopal Palace, designed by Gaudi, and if you have time, visit the chocolate museum, which recreates an old chocolate shop of the late 1800s.

Walk: 30km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Astur Plaza (or something similar)

Located close to the main square in the historic centre, you will only be 5 minutes walk from Gaudi Palace and the cathedral. Ensuite rooms are equipped with all comforts, and the dining room has typical stone walls and classic wooden furniture.

DAY 25
Walk to Rabanal del Camino

A gentle incline across farmland leads through the region of la Maragateria to the sleepy layover of Rabanal del Camino. Alternating between open plains and trails of heather and oak trees, the small patches of forest have offered shade for many a Camino hiker over the years on the ascent to Rabanal del Camino. Although a little stopover for today’s walkers, Rabanal was a significant town during the middle ages as it had many churches and a hospital founded and run by templar monks.

Walk: 21.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hostel el Refugio (or something similar)

Centrally located, this accommodation is well-known for its cosy and welcoming atmosphere. A typical stone building with wooden beam ceilings, the hotel’s restaurant is a popular choice for all walkers passing through the town.

DAY 26
Walk to Molinaseca/ Pomferrada

Leaving Rabanal, the route climbs towards the high point of Cruz Ferro (iron cross). At just 1500m, take a moment to enjoy the far-reaching views across the Camino. There are many theories as to the origins of the cross, but it is believed to have been erected in the 11th century. Traditionally, pilgrims will leave a small rock with a message on it for loved ones who they have bought from home. From the cross, the route descends into the delightful village of Molinaseca.

Walk: 26.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hostel Casa Rural el Palacio (or something similar)

Situated close to the river Hostel Casa Rural features a garden, bar and comfortable ensuite rooms. It’s only a few minutes walk to reach cafes, restaurants and the San Nicolas Church.

DAY 27
Walk to Villafranca del Bierzo

Within a couple of hours of leaving Molinaseca, you will reach Ponferrada, a former outpost of the Knights of the Templar. Do take time here to explore the magnificent castle which is said to have once housed the knights. With an abundance of cafes, it is a great opportunity to sample the traditional Camino almond cake and café con leche. Walking onwards to Villafranca, pass through the wine region of Bierzo and several small villages before arriving at Villafranca del Bierzo.

Walk: 31km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel La Puerta del Perdón (or something similar)

A friendly and rustic guesthouse, your hosts welcome you with iced lemon water and invite you to relax in their homes. Comfortable rooms and a breakfast with fresh fruits, homemade cakes and excellent coffee are the perfect set-up for another day on the Camino.

DAY 28
Walk to Herrarias/Bierzo O Cebreiro

Today, walk to the farming hamlet of Herrerias; the last stop is Castilla y Leon before crossing into Galicia. The familiar scallop shell markers guide you on your way across rolling farmland and deep into a lush valley as you follow the Valcarce River. On the approach to Herrerias, the route begins a sharp climb, which you will continue tomorrow. For this afternoon, though, head to your hotel and relax in this peaceful hillside town.

Walk: 23.5km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel El Capricho de Josana (or something similar)\

A simple hotel with great views across to the hills of Castilla y Leon, complete with garden and relaxing terrace area. The hotel is accustomed to welcoming Camino pilgrims and this is reflected in the great atmosphere they create in their onsite restaurant.

DAY 29
Walk to Triacastela

Today, continue the climb to the town of O Cebreiro. On arrival into O Cebreiro, take the opportunity to rest and explore the dry stone houses complete with thatched roofs. In the town you may even encounter musicians playing folk music with a galleta galleo (bagpipes), which stems from the Celtic connection in the middle ages. With the climbing complete for the day, you can enjoy a predominantly downhill trail to Triacastela.

Walk: 32km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Casa Pacios (or something similar)

A 17th-century rural house Casa Pacios is located just outside Triacastela. It is a wonderful contrast to spend a night in the relaxing countryside, in an ensuite room.

DAY 30
Walk to Sarria

Today you can choose from two routes. Follow a trail through a succession of villages to Samos, where you will have spectacular views of the Galician mountains over to the east. Here you can opt to take a more challenging trail to visit a remarkable Benedictine Monastery, a significant stop on the Way of St. James and a real highlight of the Camino Frances. Alternatively, you can take a rural route towards Sarria, which is a little shorter (and omits the visit to Samos). On arrival into Sarria, seek out the historic streets where you can visit the 13th-century O’Salvador Gothic church and the medieval fortress of Sarria.

Walk: 25km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Roma (or something similar)

Since 1930, Hotel Roma has been welcoming pilgrims into their hotel. Nestled away down a quiet street, the simple hotel has a traditional Galician restaurant and comfortable ensuite rooms.

DAY 31
Walk to Portomarin

Begin the day by walking through a woodland of ancient oak, birch and chestnut forests, before joining the official Camino trail. Marked by the famous scallop shell waymarks of this world-renowned route, stroll alongside fellow pilgrims as the trail undulates across grazing pastures and farm tracks, passing through tiny hamlets where you see many traditional barns. Descend into Portomarin via the Mino Reservoir, the former site of Portomarin town. In the 1960s Portomarin was moved brick by brick to higher ground, including the imposing structures of San Nicolas and San Pedro church.

Walk: 23km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Pousada de Portomarin (or something similar)

This modern hotel has been welcoming pilgrims for the last 50 years. A typical simple walkers hotel, rooms are comfortable, ensuite and bright. Other facilities include a bar, café, restaurant and a swimming pool open during the high summer months.

DAY 32
Walk to Palas de Rei

The day begins with a steady climb through pine forests, corn fields and across meadows. Today’s high point is Sierra Ligonde (720m). Here you can make a small detour to the 14th-century Romanesque church of El Salvador at Vilar de Donas, a national monument to the Knights of Santiago. The last gentle climb of the day passes through age-old villages and descends into the town of Palas de Rei (Palace of the Kings), where you will spend tonight.

Walk: 26km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Complejo la Cabana (or something similar)

Just off the main route, this lodge-style accommodation is surrounded by pine and chestnut trees. The property is split across 3 buildings, with all rooms having en-suite bathrooms. A public swimming pool is nearby if you want to cool your legs off. Afterwards, you can dine in the hotel restaurant, serving classic, regional dishes.

DAY 33
Walk to Arzua

A long but manageable day follows secluded trails through woodlands and into a region dotted with medieval castles, churches and ancient settlements. After leaving Palas de Rei you will soon reach the classic Camino village of San Xulian with its tiny 12th-century church. The trail continues to climb, crossing Porto de Boi and through the villages of Campanilla and Leboreiro, where you can visit a 13th-century Romanesque church. Before arriving in Arzua you pass the ancient town of Melide, famous for the classic Galician dish of pulpo a galega (octopus).

Walk: 29km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Casa Teodora (or something similar)

A family-run business, brothers Jesus and Gabriel manage this popular Camino stopover. The restaurant is popular with locals and serves fresh sardines and beef shank, complemented by local wines, such as a perfectly chilled Albarino and Ribeiros white wine.

DAY 34
Walk to Rua / Pedrouzo

The penultimate day of walking weaves its way towards Santiago across farmland and woodland. The trail heads through several villages, including Cortobe and Fondevila which have seemingly stood still in time since the middle ages. A gentle ascent leads up to the 18th-century hilltop chapel of Santa Irene (named after a Christian martyr). The last few km of today’s route follow a shaded trail through eucalyptus woods before arriving in the lively town of Rua.

Walk: 17km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel O’Pina (or something similar)

For over fifty years Hotel O’Pina has been welcoming pilgrims on the last leg of their journey to Santiago. Small and hospitable, the ensuite rooms are spacious and the hotel restaurant is famous for its fresh, daily serving of empanada Gallega (Galician pie).

DAY 35
Walk to Santiago de Compostela

Today, the Camino leads you into the heart of Santiago de Compostela to the majestic cathedral in Plaza de Obradoiro. Leaving Rua, rural trails give way to an urban environment as fellow walkers begin to converge for the last leg of this historic route. As you pass through Lavacolla, before crossing the stream, tradition would usually see pilgrims bathe and purify themselves in preparation for their arrival to Santiago. The final stretch to Santiago heads into the magnificent historic centre where you can present your pilgrim passport and receive your ‘Compostela’ certificate. With 2 nights in Santiago, you can relax and recharge your legs this afternoon before exploring this UNESCO listed city tomorrow.

Walk: 23km
Meals: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel Avenida (or something similar)

Only a 5-minute walk from the cathedral, this rustic hotel is located next to Alameda Park. A traditional building with a modern interior, Hotel Avenida offers a comfortable stay and being so close to the historic centre means you can easily spend the following day resting at your hotel and heading out to explore the buzz of Santiago.

DAY 36
Onward Travel

Depending on your onward travel plans, you can spend the morning soaking up the atmosphere of the plaza before heading off on your journey home.

Meals: Breakfast

What’s Included

WHAT’S INCLUDED

  • Pack-free walking

  • 25+ years experience

  • Customised

  • Eco Travel

  • 35 nights of accommodation & 35 breakfasts
  • Add a rest day/s if you wish
  • Luggage transfers as described
  • Rest days in Burgos, Leon and Santiago
  • Receiving your Compostela certificate for completing the full route – Pilgrim Passport
  • Route Notes, Maps and GPX tracks
  • Walk the full Camino Frances route (812km) from St Jean to Santiago de Compostela
  • Solo walking is possible at an extra cost – see General Info
Accommodation & Dining

ACCOMMODATION & DINING

OVERVIEW

During this tour, you will stay in simple, small family-run hotels and guest houses that have been welcoming walkers of the Camino for many years. All rooms are ensuite and, typically, in the style of the Camino; accommodations have a great atmosphere as the majority of other guests will be fellow walkers. As this walk is a very busy route, similar accommodations can be used other than that listed. Please note that booking 35 accommodations in sequence might result in the walking days being shortened or lengthened on the odd occasion to make all the accommodations line up. The accommodation shown is only an indication of the class that will be booked and we will do our best to match the standard if we cannot get what is displayed.

Single Rooms
If you are travelling with family and/or friends but would like single rooms, we would advise booking as soon as your plans are finalised to secure your rooming preferences. Single rooms incur an additional single occupancy fee.

Dining
You will be provided with 35 breakfasts. If you have any food allergies or intolerances, please let us know at the time of booking so we can let your hosts know. Should you have severe food allergies, it’s always worth bringing a few of your own snacks with you.

Many of the accommodations have their own restaurant, which serves regional dishes using local ingredients. Although dinners aren’t included in this tour, dinners can be included each evening as a supplement if you wish. Lunches can be purchased locally. This is a great part of the experience. You can either order lunch from your accommodation or buy local cheeses and meats along with a wide variety of different breads you will find along the Camino.

 

General Info

GENERAL INFO

AVAILABILITY

This tour is available from the start of April through October. Regardless of when you travel there are often celebrations along the Camino, specific to the individual towns or regions. From the jousting festival at Passo Honroso Puente through to the Rioja Wine festival in Logroño and the nationwide celebrations of Semana Santa, walking the Camino is a colourful experience.

On some occasions, but not often, the walk days may vary slightly regarding their length to what we have advertised. This will be to allow us to book the 35 accommodations in sequence to facilitate this walk.

Solo walking is allowed, but as there are many transfers that are costed as being shared across 2 walkers, this will come at an extra cost. Please speak to the office about the price of this.

WEATHER

The route runs across northern Spain and through a variety of terrain. During the early and latter part of the season, conditions can be changeable from temperate warm days through to frosty mornings and very cool nights. From May to September, rainy days are less frequent, and temperatures are steadily between 20-24 degrees. However, it is possible that you may experience a few cloudy days.

THE WALKING

We grade this walk as Challenging only because of the back-to-back walking days over 812km. We may have to shorten or even lengthen the walking day to make the accommodation bookings work. Of course, we will let you know if this happens. The Camino is a well-trodden route, so the trails are very well-defined for the most part. You will follow an ancient pilgrim trail;  whilst sections of the walk will take you deep into the picturesque countryside, you will also walk through urban environments and along roads as you follow the truest route possible.

You should be used to walking up to 30km with up to 500m of ascent and descent. On any typical day, you will hike on rocky trails, farm and forest tracks and cover long sections in the open countryside. You will sustain climbs to hilltop towns, villages, and the rolling countryside. You will also walk on some roads, so please be mindful of all road users at all times.

A moderate active lifestyle makes walking enjoyable; an exercise regime of 3 to 4 times a week is needed, in addition to your usual walks. We would also advise that you regularly walk back-to-back days to prepare for the duration of this tour which is 36 days.

The route is very well waymarked by the iconic scallop-shell markers, and with the many other walkers on the trail, it’s straightforward to find your way. For each walk, you will be provided daily walk notes, a map and the GPX tracks if you wish to use them for your own device.

HOW TO GET THERE AND AWAY

The tour starts in Saint Jean Pied de Port and finishes in Santiago de Compostela. The best way to reach Saint Jean is by arriving at one of the following airports: Madrid or Biarritz (Bayonne Train Station).

From Madrid, a 3 to 4-hour train journey connects (from the airport as well) to Pamplona.  Then a 2 hr bus ride on to St Jean.

From Biarritz (Bayonne) it is an hour by train to St Jean.

Getting away from Santiago de Compostela by train or air is very easy.  Flights go from Santiago to all over Europe.

INSURANCE

We require that you have adequate travel insurance against potential losses, damage or injury, including cancellation costs and loss of luggage.

For all trips that require international travel, you must have purchased travel insurance that also includes medical evacuation coverage.

We also charge a cancellation fee if you cancel your walking holiday after we have confirmed it to cover costs incurred from our suppliers and in the office.  See the FAQ section for more information.

Map

MAP

Departure Dates

DEPARTURE DATES

  • DATES
    AVAILABILITY
    PRICE
    PER PERSON
    Single Occupancy
    DETAILS
  • 1 Mar 2024 - 31 Oct 2024
    AVAILABLE
    Details
    from

    $5965

    SINGLE OCCUPANCY
    $1935
  • 1 Mar 2025 - 31 Oct 2025
    AVAILABLE
    Details
    from

    $6205

    SINGLE OCCUPANCY
    $2010
Faqs

FAQS

Q: What happens if I don’t want to walk one of the days, can I travel with the luggage?

Unfortunately, walkers cannot travel with the luggage. The information you are provided with has details for local taxi numbers, bus and train timetables should you wish to not walk on any day. Your accommodation hosts will also have up to date information and advice should you wish to travel to the next destination by local transport. As always, you can call us in the office should you need help during your walk.

Q: Where would you suggest adding an extra night?

Leon, a vibrant city, which has been welcoming Camino walkers for centuries! The two major sights of Leon is the Casa de Botines, designed by Antoni Guadi and Hostal San Marcos (a former monastery and shelter for pilgrims during the middle ages. This exquisite property is now a luxury parador hotel). If you wish to start your Camino in style, we can arrange an upgrade for you to this luxury hotel. Traicastela if you really want to do nothing and relax by the pool, this is the perfect hotel to do so. Once walkers have departed for the day, there really is little more to do other than to take up residence by the pool and recharge in the peace of the countryside. Santiago, of course! This city is worthy of an extra day and not just to further explore the grand cathedral. Santiago boasts a wealth of medieval architecture, tapas bars and restaurants. We can also arrange an onward walk to the coastal point of Finisterre. Regarded as the end of the world by the Romans, many pilgrims continue on walking for several days to reach Finisterre. Having completed the Camino, it is an extra 4 days to reach Finisterre with a transfer back to Santiago on the fifth day. Burgo and Legrono are also great plalces to add a rest day

Q: Can you extend our stay in Santiago de Compostela?

Of course, please let us know at the time of booking if you would like to extend your time in Santiago.

Q: Can my children walk with me?

We don't allow children under the age of 16 to do this walk.

Q: Is this tour OK for solo walkers?

Absolutely. Many people choose to complete stages of the Camino as a solo walker. There are many people walking the route and many of the overnight stays welcome hordes of walkers which means you can choose to walk your own journey or join in the camaraderie of walking with others.

Q: We’re travelling as friends but would like single rooms?

Subject to a single occupancy payment, single rooms are available. However, due to the limited accommodation single rooms might not always be available for every night of the tour, but we will let you know your options throughout the booking process.

Q: Can we reduce the days walked?

We wouldn’t suggest completing the itinerary in less than 38 days but 39 days with an extra night along the way is always a good idea. Speak to the office to insert another rest day if you want to when booking.

Q: Can we extend the days walked?

Of course, we’re happy to discuss your needs.

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Self-guided

Walk the Portuguese Coastal Camino de Santiago (way of St James) from Porto all the way to Santiago de Compostela via the coast.

Self-guided 15 Days From $2095 Moderate to Challenging What's Included

Portuguese Coastal Camino Way of St James – 15 Days

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What's Included
  • Walk the Portuguese Coastal Camino de Santiago (Way of St James) from Porto all the way to Santiago de Compostela via the coast
  • 14 night’s accommodation in 2 to 3-star (or 4- star or better on the luxury trip) character-filled hotels and breakfast on every day of the walk.
    An upgrade to 4-star and better accommodation is available.
  • Our comprehensive set of notes, detailed walking itineraries, integrated maps and insider tips (where to get the best tapas plus a lot more)
  • Pilgrim kit: passport (credentials) and shell (Viera) and walk 259kms on the Portuguese Camino the Way of St James pack free
  • All luggage transfers and transport on the track
  • Take advantage of nearly 30 years experience in organising self-guided walking holidays
  • On the ground support from local representatives
  • You can shorten the walk if you wish and start from closer to Santiago de Compostela

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ENQUIRE NOW

If you’re looking for further information on any of our walking holidays please fill out the enquiry form and we’ll be in touch.

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